S. Anril Tiatco Profile

I am Sir Anril Pineda Tiatco. And yes, Sir is really part of my name. I was not knighted - I wish I were. I am a Filipino academic from the University of the Philippines Diliman. I am interested in cultural performances - rituals, festivals and theatre performances. I am also a World Heritage Site enthusiast and an advocate of inscribing UP Diliman and Corregidor Island as World Heritage Sites. For more about me, visit: https://pages.upd.edu.ph/sptiatco/introduction

Visited Sites S. Anril Tiatco

Load map Toggle Missing/Visited

Legend

  • Cultural
  • Natural
  • Mixed

Recent Reviews S. Anril Tiatco


Baroque Churches

S. Anril Tiatco Philippines - 15-Dec-18

Baroque Churches

Over five hundred churches, inspired by the baroque, gothic and rococo traditions of Europe, were built in the Philippine archipelago during the Hispanic colonial era. Many of these churches are well preserved and are still being used as places of worship. Many of these are protected by the national government by inscribing them either as National Cultural Property or National Cultural Treasures.

Today, four baroque churches stand out: Church of the Immaculate Conception of San Agustin (San Agustin Church) in Intramuros, Manila; Saint Augustine Church (popularly known as Paoay Church) in Ilocos Norte; Church of Our Lady of the Assumption (popularly known as Santa Maria Church); and Santo Tomas de Villanueva Parish Church (popularly known as Miag-ao Church) in Iloilo. In 1993, these churches were elevated to the status of UNESCO World Heritage Sites (with modification of boundaries in 2013). They are collectively identified as Baroque Churches of the Philippines

Read On

Sydney Opera House

S. Anril Tiatco Philippines - 09-Dec-18

Sydney Opera House

A trip to Sydney is never complete without a visit to the Sydney Opera House, one of the most popular and most visited tourist destinations not only in Australia but arguably in the entire world. Just like any other first timers in the “Land Down Under,” the very first thing I did on my first trip to Sydney (and in entire country-continent of Australia) was to walk my way to this popular man-made Oz-ian destination.

The dynamic harbour seems to be embodied by Jørn Utzon’s design: a playful encounter among the different elements found in the area: the gigantic and very busy Harbour Bridge, the imposing muscle-flexes of sea vessels and ferries, and the graceful dances of the yachts and other smaller boats

Read On

Plantin-Moretus Museum

S. Anril Tiatco Philippines - 23-Oct-18

Plantin-Moretus Museum

Johannes Gutenberg’s movable-type was quicker than the traditional woodblock printing. This paved the way for the rapid printing of the bible (“Gutenberg Bible”) which eventually placed the movable-type as an important “invention” in the early modern European period. The printing press even assisted Martin Luther in the quick dissemination of the infamous “Ninety-five Theses” or “Disputation on the Power of Indulgences” which shook the authority of the Catholic Church. Eventually, the technology of the press rapidly spread in the European continent. One of the figures who was influenced by Gutenberg’s invention was Christophe Plantin.

Read On

Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus

S. Anril Tiatco Philippines - 21-Oct-18

Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus

At the heart of Mumbai is the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus or more popularly known as Victoria Terminus. Inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2004, Victoria Terminus is currently the headquarter of the city’s Central Railway System. The building was designed by Frederick William Stevens inspired by the concept of Victorian Italianate Gothic Revival architecture. At the same time, it was meant to have some similarities with Indian Goth architecture.

The terminus is still functional, and to date, it is one of the busiest railway stations in the entire sub-continent of India. The Victoria Terminus serves as a terminal for both long-distance trains and commuter trains.

Read On

Belfries

S. Anril Tiatco Philippines - 14-Oct-18

My visits to Flanders (Brussels and Brugge in 2016; Antwerp, Mechelen, and Ghent in 2018) were also visits to some spectacular towers called the Belfries. Many of the towers I saw are attached to other huge structures. Many of them support the carillon bells, which are played every hour providing a soundscape that brings everyone back in time. I learned from my arts studies class back in college that etymologically, belfries have nothing to do with bells. The word is derived from the Medieval French word berfrei that literally means tower in a fortress (or a castle). Sometimes, it is used to denote the high watchtower of a fortification of the Medieval era.

Read On

Profile Data

Name
S. Anril Tiatco
Country
Philippines
Website
website

Recently Visited WHS

Update 15.10.19

Reviewed TWHS