Timeline Connections

All connections part of Timeline.

54
ConnectionDescriptionSites
Archean The Archean Eon is one of the four geologic eons of Earth history, occurring 4,000 to 2,500 million years ago. 1
Built in the 10th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 10th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 19
Built in the 10th century BC The 10th century BC started the first day of 1000 BC and ended the last day of 901 BC. 1
Built in the 10th millennium BC 3
Built in the 11th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 11th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 45
Built in the 12th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 12th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 50
Built in the 13th century 56
Built in the 14th century 41
Built in the 15th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 15th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 55
Built in the 16th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 16th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 90
Built in the 17th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 17th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 67
Built in the 18th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 18th century constructions. 72
Built in the 19th Century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 19th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 69
Built in the 1st century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 1st century constructions. 22
Built in the 1st century BC WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 1st century BC constructions. 14
Built in the 20th century These WHS were all constructed between 1901 and 2000. 41
Built in the 2nd century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 2nd century constructions. 9
Built in the 2nd century BC 6
Built in the 2nd Millennium BC WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 2nd millennium BC constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which millennium does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 25
Built in the 3rd century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 3rd century constructions. 11
Built in the 3rd century BC 18
Built in the 3rd Millennium BC WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 3rd millennium BC constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which millennium does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 15
Built in the 4th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 4th century constructions. 19
Built in the 4th century BC 10
Built in the 4th millennium BC 8
Built in the 5th century 11
Built in the 5th century BC WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 5th century BC constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 9
Built in the 5th millennium BC 8
Built in the 6th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 6th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 21
Built in the 6th century BC 12
Built in the 6th millennium BC 2
Built in the 7th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 7th century constructions. 17
Built in the 7th century BC WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 7th century BC constructions. 4
Built in the 7th millennium BC 2
Built in the 8th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 8th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 28
Built in the 8th century BC 5
Built in the 8th millennium BC 3
Built in the 9th century WHS whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from 9th century constructions. Where construction straddles the centuries the date of conception/commencement is used i.e which century does the site really "belong" to in spirit. 17
Built in the 9th century BC 1
Built in the 9th millennium BC 3
Cretaceous The Cretaceous is a geologic period and system from circa 145 - 4 to 66 million years (Ma) ago. In the geologic timescale, the Cretaceous follows the Jurassic period and is followed by the Paleogene period of the Cenozoic era.

The Cretaceous was a period with a relatively warm climate, resulting in high eustatic sea levels and creating numerous shallow inland seas. These oceans and seas were populated with now extinct marine reptiles, ammonites and rudists, while dinosaurs continued to dominate on land. At the same time, new groups of mammals and birds, as well as flowering plants, appeared. The Cretaceous ended with a large mass extinction. (wiki)
11
Early Pleistocene The Early Pleistocene (also known as the Lower Pleistocene) is a subepoch in the international geologic timescale or a subseries in chronostratigraphy, being the earliest or lowest subdivision of the Quaternary period/system and Pleistocene epoch/series. It spans the time between 2.588 - 0.005 Ma (million years ago) and 0.781 - 0.005 Ma. The Early Pleistocene consists of the Gelasian and the Calabrian ages. (wiki) 23
Eocene The Eocene epoch, lasting from 56 to 33.9 million years ago, is a major division of the geologic timescale and the second epoch of the Paleogene Period in the Cenozoic Era. (wiki) 10
Holocene The Holocene is a geological epoch which began at the end of the Pleistocene (at 11,700 calendar years BP) [2] and continues to the present. It has been identified with the current warm period, known as MIS 1 and based on that past evidence, can be considered an interglacial in the current ice age. (wiki) 47
Jurassic The Jurassic is a geologic period and system that extends from 201.3- 0.6 Ma (million years ago) to 145- 4 Ma; from the end of the Triassic to the beginning of the Cretaceous. The Jurassic constitutes the middle period of the Mesozoic Era, also known as the Age of Reptiles. 7
Late Pleistocene The Late Pleistocene or Tarantian stage is defined by the base of the Eemian interglacial phase before the final glacial episode of the Pleistocene 126,000 - 5,000 years ago. The end of the age is defined as 11,700 calendar years b2k (before AD 2000). The age represents the end of the Pleistocene epoch and is followed by the Holocene epoch. (wiki) 40
Middle Pleistocene The Middle Pleistocene, more specifically referred to as the Ionian stage, is a period of geologic time from ca. 781 to 126 thousand years ago.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_Pleistocene
18
Miocene The Miocene is the first geological epoch of the Neogene Period and extends from about 23.03 to 5.332 million years ago (wiki) 22
Oligocene The Oligocene is a geologic epoch of the Paleogene Period and extends from about 33.9 million to 23 million years before the present . .. [it] refers to the sparsity of additional modern mammalian species of fauna after a burst of evolution during the Eocene. (wiki) 8
Paleocene The Paleocene is a geologic epoch that lasted from about 66 to 56 million years ago. The Paleocene Epoch immediately followed the mass extinction event at the end of the Cretaceous, known as the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary, which marks the demise of non-avian dinosaurs, the giant marine reptiles and much other fauna and flora. The die-off of the dinosaurs left unfilled ecological niches worldwide. (wiki) 8
Paleozoic The Paleozoic spanned from roughly 542 to 251 million years ago. During the late Paleozoic, great forests of primitive plants thrived on land forming the great coal beds of Europe and eastern North America. By the end of the era, the first large, sophisticated reptiles and the first modern plants (conifers) had developed. The Paleozoic Era ended with the largest mass extinction in Earth's history, the Permian-Triassic Extinction Event. 16
Pliocene Sites whose OUV derives entirely or significantly from the Pliocene Epoch, the period in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.332 million to 2.588 million years before present. 20
Proterozoic The Proterozoic is a geological eon representing the time just before the proliferation of complex life on Earth. It extended from 2,500 Ma to 542.0-1.0 Ma (million years ago), and is the most recent part of the informally named "Precambrian" time. (wiki) 4
Triassic The Triassic is a geologic period and system that extends from about 250 to 200 Ma (252.2 - 0.5 to 201.3 - 0.2 million years ago). It is the first period of the Mesozoic Era, and lies between the Permian and Jurassic periods. Both the start and end of the period are marked by major extinction events. (wiki) 7