Trade Pilgrimage Routes of North-Western Ghana

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Trade Pilgrimage Routes of North-Western Ghana is part of the Tentative list of Ghana in order to qualify for inclusion in the World Heritage List.

The Trade Pilgrimage Routes of North-Western Ghana are the southern extensions of the historical trade routes between North Africa, the empires in the savannah belt and the gold deposits in the rainforests of Ghana. The Arab traders also wanted to convert the people along these routes to Islam. The mosques in northern Ghana are remains of the Islamic diaspora. The mosques are built of sun-dried mud bricks, two architectural styles can be distinguished: The Djenné style of the Wuriyanga Mosque and the Sudanic style with the Larabanga Mosque as the most famous example.

Map of Trade Pilgrimage Routes of North-Western Ghana

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The coordinates shown for all tentative sites were produced as a community effort. They are not official and may change on inscription.

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Michael Novins

United States - 08-Jan-20 -

Trade Pilgrimage Routes of North-Western Ghana (T) by Michael Novins

While returning from Mole National Park to Tamale, I stopped briefly in Larabanga in northern Ghana to visit its whitewashed mud-plaster and wooden-beam mosque, which will celebrate its six hundredth anniversary in two years, making it the oldest mosque in the country and one of the oldest in West Africa and earning it the nickname the Mecca of West Africa.


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Full Name
Trade Pilgrimage Routes of North-Western Ghana
Country
Ghana
Added
2000
Type
Cultural
Link
By ID
2000 Revision

Successor to former TWHS Traditional mosques of Northern Ghana (1983)

2000 Added to Tentative List

1983 Deferred

As former TWHS Traditional mosques of Northern Ghana: Deferred until receipt of necessary info

The site has 2 locations

Trade Pilgrimage Routes of North-Western Ghana: Larabanga (T)
Trade Pilgrimage Routes of North-Western Ghana: Mosque at Wuriyanga near Garu (T)

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