Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity

Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity is part of the Tentative list of Germany in order to qualify for inclusion in the World Heritage List.

Click here for a short description of the site, as delivered by the state party.

Map of Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity

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The coordinates shown for all tentative sites were produced as a community effort. They are not official and may change on inscription.

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Jakob Frenzel

Germany - 25-Apr-20 -

Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity (T) by Jakob Frenzel

November 2019 - in my wife's  business trip to Erfurt, my daughter and me joined to enjoy the area. Erfurt is a beautiful town. It has a quite unique cathedral, the Krämerbrücke is besides Florence and Bath one of the few bridges with houses on top. And there is also some Bauhaus, since Weimar is just around the corner. But for becoming a whs, Erfurt decided to nominate its jewish heritage. Two sites, that were only discovered lately during renovation. The Synagoge was built in between sheds, which now vanished. And the mikveh was covered with soil before. Therefore both sites are well preserved. We decided not to visit the Museum inside, but just have a glance from outside. The mikveh you can only see through a glass window. On  a guided tour through Erfurt at evening, that was organized through the Business trip, I asked the guide about the mikveh. And...he knew the code to actually visit the interior. What a lucky chance. 1500 year old jewish stones.

However,  I am not sure about the nomination. Erfurt is not like Trebic, but jews have only been part of the population. The sites propably have OUV. But please make some Serial nomination out of it.


Matejicek

Czechia - 06-Feb-20 -

Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity (T) by Matejicek

I think that this TWHS should be deleted or changed at least. Otherwise I do not fully understand the strategy of the state party of Germany.

There are 3 active sites on the German TWHS related directly to former Jewish communities: (1) Synagogue in Erfurt as one of the oldest, largest and best preserved synagogues in Central Europe, (2) ShUM as the important community of Ashkenazi Jews with origin deeply in Middle Ages, and (3) the cemetery in Altona as the second largest Sephardic cemetery outside Portugal.

It is not likely that all three sites will be inscribed, and I can see certain rivalry between Erfurt and ShUM: The ShUM nomination has been already submitted for year 2021, and it is cleverly stated there that “The lasting influence of the ShUM communities on Ashkenazi Judaism is attested to this day by major monuments – e.g. the excellently preserved religious buildings (the synagogue and the ritual bath) in Erfurt and the mediaeval Jewish monuments in Regensburg, Vienna and Andernach.”

The justification of the Altona cemetery plays a different game stressing not Ashkenazi but its Sephardic character.

I am afraid that these are only political games, and interest about the genuine OUV lies aside, and it is somehow hidden in the elaborated phrases. All it is about the fact, that there is only one WHS in Europe focused (almost) only on the Jewish testimony – Třebíč. The rest Jewish monuments are parts of much bigger urban ensembles, as seen in Prague, Cracow, Ferrara, Bardějov, etc. - that make sense to me.

This TWHS consists of three structures located close to each other in the very center of otherwise very beautiful Erfurt: (i) the synagogue which was closed during time of my visit, but even from outside one can partly read the history of the building with visible parts dating to 1270 and 1300 (PHOTO).

(ii) During very recent excavation, the mikveh of unusual size and structure was found close to the Kramerbrucke Bridge, and I could spot it through the window.

(iii) The last part is the stone house with fine details from around 1250 on Benedictsplatz 1 (I could not enter and see it), which was apparently owned by Jewish community in middle ages, taht is arguable and this is the weakest part of the nomination if this really contributes to OUV.

Based on my search on internet, there are about 20 medieval synagogues (sometimes also with the mikweh) in Europe: in Portugal (Tomar), Spain (Cordoba, 2x Toledo, Hijar, Barcelona), France (2x Avignon), Germany (Erfurt + ShUM), Austria (Korneuburg), Czechia (Prague), Slovenia (Maribor), Italy (Ferrara, Trani), Croatia (Dubrovnik), Hungary (Buda), Poland (Cracow), and Belarus (Hrodna). From this list, I saw/visited medieval synagogues in Ferrara, Trani, Sopron, Worms, Speyer, Erfurt, Prague, and the old mikweh in Montpellier. I also visited a lot of synagogues from later periods: such as around 10 (!) synagogues in Prague, and many others in Czechia, including Třebíč, Pilsen, etc., and also the small Jewish quarter with synagogue in Pitigliano in Tuscany, and I am sure I forgot some places… My favorite is the old new synagogue in Prague, which is perfectly preseved, still in use and built in the same time as the visible parts of the old synagogue in Erfurt.

It is evident, that the testimony of Jewish community is very complex and it is difficult to separate it from the context of other cultures. Thus, I cannot see any OUV in the single synagogue in Erfurt. The building itself is very old but certainly not unique as it has been built in standard medieval style found elsevere in Europe.

The chances of ShUM are much higher – I am planning to visit all the ShUM components again, because I have not yet seen the cemetery in Mainz. I will not be surprised also in the case of success of Altona cemetery, but my guess is it will be submitted as a serial nomination with other related sites all over the world.


Kbecq

Belgium - 02-Oct-16 -

Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity (T) by Kbecq

As mentioned in the review below, the building has not been used as synagogue for a very long time, but rather as warehouse and restaurant/ballroom. In the picture, you can still see the ventilation system from the restaurant. Because the building was no longer recognisable as a synagogue, it survived the Third Reich.

We visited the museum on a Tuesday to find out that the entrance was free (don't know if this true for every Tuesday), including a guided tour. The tour was given by two women, one specialist in judaism and one muslima who both explained the history of the synagogue & the rituals of both religions.

Although certainly interesting, we also feel that the site lacks outstanding universal value to be recognised as a WHS.


Hubert

Austria - 21-May-15 -

Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity (T) by Hubert Scharnagl

The subtitle sounds a bit overblown and boastful compared to what this T-list site actually includes, namely a synagogue, the ruins of a ritual bath and a secular building. The photo shows the synagogue, it is the same view as in the photo of the Wiki article and the same view as in almost all photos that can be found on the web, indicating that there is not much more to see. The oldest parts of the building have been dated back to the late 11th century, but nothing inside is reminiscent of the original use. At least the façade with the lancet windows and the rosette looks like a religious building. After the pogrom in 1349, the building was used as a warehouse for several centuries, later as a restaurant with a ballroom. Therefore, it was no longer recognisable as a synagogue for a long time. In the 1990s, the Old Synagogue was rediscovered, renovated in the following years, and opened as a museum in 2009. The museum shows medieval Hebrew manuscripts and models documenting the architectural history of the synagogue. The most important exhibit is the Erfurt Treasure, consisting of silver coins and gold and silver jewellery. The treasure was hidden by a wealthy Jew in 1349 and rediscovered in 1998. The ballroom from the 19th century can still be seen on the upper floor.

Not far from the synagogue is the ritual bath, or rather its ruins. The ruins were discovered and excavated only a few years ago. Today, the mikveh is overbuilt by a protective building and can only be visited with a (free) guided tour (weekly on Thursday afternoon). But you can take a look at the ruins through a small window on the roof of the building. I visited Erfurt in 2013 and took a guided tour. The mikveh is located at the banks of the River Gera, so it's only a few steps down to the bath. There is not more to see than the water basin and the side walls up to the height where the vaulting begins. Well, it's not worth to plan your trip according to the date of the guided tours.

Finally, the Stone House, a residential building in the centre of the old town, that once had Jewish owners. The T-list entry mentions that the interior has a painted beam ceiling and other unique architectural elements, but the house is not yet open to the public, thus I can not report on that. From the outside it's just an old building between other old buildings. Admittedly, it is the oldest wall, but can easily be overlooked and I had difficulties to identify the right house.

The three buildings are close together in the centre of the lovely old town and not far from the Krämerbrücke (a kind of northern version of the Ponte Vecchio). The remains are of a remarkable age, but that's the most impressive about them.

It has been proposed to combine the nominations of the ShUM cities and from Erfurt, but I don't think that this would be an improvement. There is no obvious connection between them. The strength of the ShUM nomination is the proven significance for the development of Ashkenazi Judaism, the extension by Erfurt would rather weaken the proposal. In contrast, the sites in Erfurt have been rediscovered only recently and further research is needed to reveal their historical background. Thus the Erfurt approach is more general: to testify “everyday life, religion and town history”. However, I doubt that the sites have the quality to tell a compelling story and meet this ambitious claim.


Full Name
Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity
Country
Germany
Added
2015
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By ID
2015 Added to Tentative List

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Old Synagogue and Mikveh in Erfurt - Testimonies of everyday life, religion and town history between change and continuity (T)
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