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Israel and Palestine

 
Author Assif
Partaker
#1 | Posted: 24 Jan 2014 08:07 | Edited by: Assif 
Some responses to questions raised by Paul Tanner:

I would be interested in anyone commenting on the Forum about the Bible's attitude towards "Masseboth" (plural!) as, from my limited investigations and understanding, it seems rather contradictory.

Hazor was never a Jewish city. As such, it practiced idol worship. Some of the idols are on display at the Israel Museum.

Israel has indicated that it might want to add yet more Tels to the inscription and a map in the Nomination File shows another 7 including our "old friend" Tel Dan which has of course been (unsuccessfully) pursuing a separate nomination for just the Triple Arch Gate element of the Tel.

Three of the tels (Gezer, Lakhish and Arad) are currently pursuing nomination as an extension. How long it is going to take until they appear on the official T-list noone knows.

Well, it may not (yet?) be among the proposals for the "Top 50 Missing" sites but Tell es-Sultan (better known as "Jericho") is claimed to be the world's earliest (known) walled city.

It actually is. Palestine Territories - Jericho C ORIG

It seems rather strange to be reviewing a Palestinian Tentative List site when we visited it as an Israeli National Park using our Israeli 2 week "multi visit" pass! The answer lies in the fact that, whilst it may be within "Palestine" as recognized by the Oslo Accords, Qumran is still under full Israeli control.

I think this was one of the reasons for choosing this site. This one as well as Hebron are under Israeli jurisdiction despite being internationally acknowledged as Palestinian territory. These were probably the sites that politically challenged Israel on the Palestinian T-list. Another such site is Battir, whereby the Palestinians urge for an emergency nomination to prevent to separation wall from passing in this area.

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#2 | Posted: 24 Jan 2014 09:33 | Edited by: Solivagant 
Assif:
I would be interested in anyone commenting on the Forum about the Bible's attitude towards "Masseboth" (plural!) as, from my limited investigations and understanding, it seems rather contradictory.

Hazor was never a Jewish city. As such, it practiced idol worship. Some of the idols are on display at the Israel Museum.


But is it as "simple" as that?
As I understand it there are many references to "Masseboth" in the Bible and not all of them are condemnatory. See
http://www.biblicalwritings.com/massebah-the-anchor-bible-dictionary/

I particularly ask in relation to Hazor since neither the on-site notices NOR the hand-out on the site are clear whether the "Cultic objects" at the site are Canaanite or Israelite - hence my use of "?" in my review. The on site notice states
"Citadel and Cultic Installation
This cultic installation ("High Place") was built in the 11th C BCE (Period of the Judges). It is located at what was .. the highest elevation at Hazor .... Various cultic objects including the Biblical "Massebah" were found here... The Citadel (from the period of the Kingdom of Israel ...."
Assif:
Hazor was never a Jewish city
?? I understood that there were structures etc from an Israeli period after the defeat of the Canaanites?
So -I take it that the Cultic Installation including the Masseboth WERE Canaanite and were "destroyed" by "Joshua" and that the Israeli citadel postdates their use??

Author Assif
Partaker
#3 | Posted: 24 Jan 2014 10:36 
Sorry, Solivagant. I confused masseboth with misbehoth (monuments with altars).
You are right the function of the masseboth is more versatile, hence the more elaborate religious attitude.
As far as I know, Jews never settled Hazor. Israelite period is the period when it is assumed the two Israelite kingdoms (Israel and Judea) existed. However, the bible describes several other peoples, collectively known as the Canaanites that continued to live in what is now known as Israel during this period. Hazor continued to serve as a regional centre of these peoples during the Israelite period as well.
For example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabin

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#4 | Posted: 24 Jan 2014 10:49 
Thanks Assif - it is all very complicated for us "non Jews". We may have been brought up on the Old Testament but (in my case at least) never really took in its historical aspects!

I hadn't appreciated that the "Canaanites" continued to live as such in the area after their conquest and that structures from that period would be called "Israelite period" but the link you have provided re the second of the "Jabins" is clear.

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 Israel and Palestine

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