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New Tentative Lists

 
 
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Author Khuft
Partaker
#16 | Posted: 24 Mar 2011 09:45 
Also a new site for Eritrea:

Qohaito Cultural Landscape

Supposedly an important pre-Aksumite site. Never heard about it before, but seems like Eritrea is just trying to say that they had important civilizational sites before Ethiopia - i.e. pursuing its feud against Ethiopia on the cultural level too.

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#17 | Posted: 24 Mar 2011 19:23 | Edited by: Solivagant 
I thought I recognised the name - have just checked my travel diary and confirmed that my wife and I visited Qohaito during our 2006 Eritrean trip. I also remember being rather annoyed when we left to discover that our driver wasn't continuing south to another archaeological site at Matara. This was the more important site to me at the time since I knew that Ethiopia had unsuccessfully nominated it on several occasions during the years of the Derg. Such late cancellations of where we could go were unfortunately very common in Eritrea, possibly because we were there just at the time that Ethiopia was invading Somalia in support of its de jure government against the Islamic Courts Union. In all likelihood Eritrea was arming/financing the Islamists. In any case its irrational and xenophobic government seemed determined to keep us away from anywhere south of Massawa on the coast and south of Adi Keih on the road to Ethiopia, other than the 11extra kms to Qohaito. Our car provider hadn't told us that he hadn't got permission to go to Matara!

When Els gets back and adds the site to the T List entries I will look out a photo and do a review. There was really very little to see in the way of "remains" - although it apparently hasn't been excavated. What there is contains both Axumite and pre-Axumite elements. Its location right on the edge of the escarpment is rather fine however. Ethiopia had also tried to gain inscription for the ruins of Adulis also now in Eritrea and the port from which trade to and from Axum passed through Qohaito.

Of course Eritrea and Ethiopia are able to agree on almost nothing apart from their mutual hatred. Eritrea regards Ethiopia as having "stolen" the artifacts it excavated from Matara and Adulis but Ethiopia refuses to return them

I note that Eritrea has registered Qohaito as a "Cultural landscape" and these seem to be both popular and successful nominations among Africa countries over recent years. We were shown cave paintings of unknown antiquity so there is evidence of man's occupation of the plateau over a very long period right through to today's tribes. Whether Eritrea really is trying to put one over Ethiopia I don't know and I don't really understand what it is trying to achieve by registering this single addition to its T List - the site description is very unfocussed and all encompassing and, in its stated form unlikely to succeed? Unless it is receiving large amounts of foreign assistance I can't see it being able to bring ANY site to a successful nomination - Qohaito showed no evidence of any government activity/protection when we were there. Eritrea would seem to have plenty of other far more important things on its plate!! And its existing T List entry of the Art Deco buildings of Asmara represents a real gem of worldwide significance which Eritrea should really be doing more to preserve. Eritrea by the way is the only country in the world where a rifle has been pointed at me "with meaning" - for taking a photo of a run down Art Deco cinema which was deemed to be too close to the President's palace!!

Author elsslots
Admin
#18 | Posted: 24 Mar 2011 23:12 | Edited by: elsslots 
Solivagant:
When Els gets back and adds the site to the T List entries


Here it is: http://www.worldheritagesite.org/sites/t5600.html

Author elsslots
Admin
#19 | Posted: 16 Apr 2011 01:55 
Malawi has updated its Tentative List, I've added them at http://www.worldheritagesite.org/countries/malawi.html

Author winterkjm
Partaker
#20 | Posted: 22 Apr 2011 13:14 | Edited by: winterkjm 
Latvia has developed a new Tentative list.

Viking Monuments and Sites / Grobiņa archaeological complex (2011)

Kuldīga Old Town in the Primeval Valley of the River Venta (2011)

Meanders of the Upper Daugava (2011)

Author winterkjm
Partaker
#21 | Posted: 22 Apr 2011 13:19 
Turkey has added 4 new sites to their already extensive Tentative list.
(Totaling 27 nominations)

Esrefoglu Mosque (2011)

The Archaeological Site of Göbeklitepe (2011)

Hatay, St. Pierre Church (2011)

Bergama (2011)

Author winterkjm
Partaker
#22 | Posted: 22 Apr 2011 13:23 | Edited by: winterkjm 
India has added a new site.

Historic city of Ahmadabad (2011)

Bosnia and Herzegovina have added a new site.

Stećaks - Mediaeval Tombstones (2011)

Argentina has added a new site.

Campos Volcánicos Llancanelo y Payun Matru, Distrito Payunia (2011)

Author winterkjm
Partaker
#23 | Posted: 20 May 2011 06:11 | Edited by: winterkjm 
Just recently I visited many sites on the Korean T list. I will write reviews and add pictures in the coming weeks. Here are my initial reactions.

*Sites of fossilized dinosaurs throughout the Southern seacoast (2002)
- I visited the Dinosaur footprints in Goseong. (Right next to a brand new dinosaur museum) Footpints are interesting, but the beauty of the rugged coast is the major highlight. I was glad I could make out the footprints and trackways, it was easier to spot because the footprints are ussually apparent because small pools of water form in them after the tides change.

*Southwestern Coast Tidal Flats (2010)
- Upon visiting Suncheon Bay I quickly came to the conclusion that these highly diverse Tidal Flats will become a WHS in the near future. One of the most beautiful places in Korea. I am now very interested in visiting some other tidal flat sites in Korea. Besides Suncheon, there are 5 other major tidal flat locations in southwestern Korea. I expect this nomination to be inscribed during the 2013 or 2014 WHC.

*Namhansanseong - Ancient Fortified Military and Cultural Landscape of Mt. Namhansan (2010)
- The fortress is impressive, the gates certainly stand out, and the view of Seoul from the south is stunning on a clear day. However, I would consider this sites chance of inscription as a toss up. It certainly has a chance, the fortress played a major role during the Joseon dynasty, acting as the protective barrier of Southern Seoul, and more importantly as a temporary palace and headcourters for the King in times of peril. (In which purpose it was used on occasion.)

*Upo Wetland (2011)
- I was pleasantly suprised by Upo. I honestly did not know what to expect. No one in Korea I knew ever visited Upo marsh, while only a few had even heard of it. The Upo wetland is really out of the way for most travellers, located deep in the Gyeongsangnam countryside. I highly reccomend upon arrival renting out a bike, which is conveniently located at the entrance of the marsh. The marsh is beautiful, and you will undoubtably see wildlife. I primarily saw cranes and ducks. The marsh is somewhat small in comparison to most natural nominations, but I would not be suprised if Upo became a WHS.

*Naganeupseong, Town Fortress and Village (2011)
- Nagan village has two defining characteristics. It is not a village of the aristocracy, but one of the common people, with thatched roofs and simple stone walls. The second important detail is the village is protected by a fortress that encloses the village built to protect the inhabitants from Japanese soldiers or pirates. People still live in the village, and some of the homes have been almost completely redone or refurbished, but multiple preserved homes remain. As well as some of the town government buildings. There is a pretty good chance this village will be inscribed because it is the only one if its kind left in Korea. A century ago there were a hundred such villages, but now there is only Nagan.

I will visit more tentative sites in Korea in the coming days.

Author winterkjm
Partaker
#24 | Posted: 4 Jun 2011 09:21 | Edited by: winterkjm 
*Ancient Mountain Fortresses in Central Korea (2010)
- Anyone familiar with Korea and its long history will know there are an incredible amount of fortresses in Korea. Current estimates number 2,400 fortresses in Korea. (offcourse varying degrees of intact fortresses remain, some only being earthen fortresses) Nearly every national or provincial park in Korea has at least one sanseong (fortress). There are basically three types of fortresses in Korea: Fortress to protect the Royal Family - Fortress to protect a town/city/village - Mountain Fortress (being by far the most numerous) The fortresses in this nomination are unique in the fact that all are located in the border region of Korea's ancient three kingdoms: Silla, Baekjae, and Goguryeo. Nearly all 7 fortresses in this serial nomination were held. rebuilt, or restored by two or more dynasties. I visited Samnyeon sanseong & Sangdang sanseong (I may visit two more in the Chungju vacinity). Samnyeon sanseong is unique in that it is very much a ruined fortress and was not rebuilt by the Joseon dynasty (this fortress is a Silla fortress and is in rough shape, this fortress was nominated individually on Korea's previous T-list) Perhaps unfortunately there is a completely rebuilt section of Samnyeon sanseong, and it stands out; also the fortress is kind of out of the way. (no tourist facilities) Sangdangsanseong is a much more common mountain fortress in Korea, heavily restored early in the Joseon Dynasty this fortress is mostly intact, with some newly renovated sections. Beautiful location. The vast amount of fortresses in Korea have played a central role in defending the nation. Ancient Korea was never conquered by its two larger neighbors in large part because of the impossiblity of enemy forces capturing countless formidable town and mountain fortresses. One fortress would be captured, word would spread to a nearby fortress to prepare, and another siege would commence. China and Japan both suffered slow costly defeats trying to invade Korea. So there is tremendous historic importance concerning Korea's ancient fortresses, however do they merit the label of OUV? I honestly don't know. Hwaeseong is already incribed, but that is a recent fortress only built in 1799. Samnyeon Sanseong is from the 7th century, and marks Silla's slow expansion and eventual success (together with Tang dynasty China) in defeating Baekjae and Goguryeo. I am curious to see the outcome of this nomination.

*Iksan Historic Areas (2010)
- First and foremost if you visit Iksan hopefully it's by car, as these sites are spread out and only few of them are accessible by bus. I visited Mureuksaji temple site, and the Wanggung Palace site. These historic areas really feel like archeological sites. There are few remians, but fascinating nonetheless. Interestingly enough the famous and enormous Mureuk 5-story pagoda (originally 7-story) no longer exisits in a sense. Pretty much the only major remain at the site, Mureuk pagoda has been dismantled to strengthen the base and back portion. So what you see is a huge building over a largely disapeared pagoda. The original stones are numbered and layed out over an area the size of a basketball court, all properly numbered and waiting to be put back together. (very much like a jigsaw puzzle) The pagoda was in serous danger of completely collapsing under its huge weight, so I think the current plan is the best option. Mureksaji was likely the largest temple in Korea, and the pagoda is the largest to my knowledge. The Japanese in 1915 built concrete supports at the back of the pagoda, helping the pagoda last another hundred years. When the pagoda is put back together it will be whole for the first time in about 400 years. (the pagoda dates back to around 600 AD, likely the oldest stone pagoda in Korea) The Wanggung palace site is almost completely gone with only another stone pagoda, and some small stone pillar and wall structers remaining. (most of the site is closed for archeological studies. In the Iksan area alone there have been more than 19,000 Baekjae artifacts already unearthed. The sites in Iksan are interesting, but most visitors will come away somewhat disapointed, visit some of the excellent museums to add value to the sites. Undoubtably there will be a Baekjae nomination inscribed, it is a very important dynasty in Korea, which came into contact frequently with Japan and China along its coastal areas though trade and regional dominance. (noteworthy is Baekjae's influence on ancient Japanese kingdoms) I expect the historic areas of Gongju, Buyeo, and Iksan will be combined for a successful Baekjae Dynasty nomination.

*Oeam Village (2011)
- Oeam village is a beautiful small village, whose inhabitants are largely in the 60+ range. The village is not really a tourist site, more being an actual old village which exhibits quite a few authentic structures. The unique aspect of Oeam is the artificial water system that goes through the entire village for gardens and agriculture. I enjoyed my visit, slightly dissapointed at first, but after wandering the village for about an hour my enjoyment increased. There are no wow sights in the village, the atmosphere and setting is more whats on display. Very little tourist facilities. I doubt the site will be inscribed, many villagers have upgraded their quant homes, adding modern comfort improvements.

All of Korea's new T list is at varying levels of readiness for inscription by Unesco. Many of the sites are being developed to be more toursit friendly sites, with new English information panels, and quite a bit of restoration work.

In 2008 I visited Seokaksan National Park, and Gongju and Buyeo historic sites. This leaves only 3 tentative sights I have not yet visited. Perhaps in the coming years. I will be heading back to the USA soon. (2012 or 2013 maybe?) I have been pleasantly suprised by the new T list. I expect about 3 or 4 sites of the 13 to be inscribed. Not a high number, but Korea already has 10 WHS!!!

I have previously reviewed both Gongju and Buyeo Historic Sites and Mt. Seoraksan Natural Preserve. When I come back to Los Angeles I will review the latest sites I have visited with pictures, including my recent trip the Philippines.

I am now nearing completion of my 1 month return trip to Korea (with a week side trip to the Philippines) and I have had a busy itinerary. Furthermore, I visited other parts of serial nominations I had not visited. I had previously visited some of the Ganghwa Island dolmens in 2008. This time I got the chance to visit the Gochang Dolmen cluster. Very impressive in number and some dolmen were pretty large in the stone table style. However, concerning dolmens only the huge dolmen in Gangha truly wowed me. On another note, I visited 4 more Joseon dynasty tomb clusters (bringing my count to 8) My favorite tombs are King Taejo at Donggureung, King Taejeong at Heolleung Cluster, King Sejong at the Yeongneung Cluster, and finally King Sejo at the Gwangneung Cluster (which probably has the most beautiful location, located in a Unesco Biosphere Reserve). I should mention, the final two Joseon Dynasty Emperors, Gojong and his son's tomb are fascinating as well, but you can't actually walk up to the tombs at the moment. (The statues are certainly interesting though, a camel?) If you visit these 4 or 5 tomb clusters you will see more variety in tombs, some of the most important rulers, and some beautiful natural locations around Seoul and Gyeongi-do. In a couple days I will visit the recently added Hahoe Village, part of the Historic Villages of Korea WHS, which will conclude my stay in Korea for the time being.

Obviosuly, I have a passion for Korea.

Author winterkjm
Partaker
#25 | Posted: 11 Aug 2011 01:09 | Edited by: winterkjm 
Seems like a fairly short list of new tentative sites for 2011. So far only 43, though the new UK and Netherland tentative list is still not on the Unesco site. When will these sites actually be added?

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#26 | Posted: 13 Aug 2011 14:34 | Edited by: Solivagant 
The Web site of the UK's Department for Culture Media and Sport which is responsible for the UK's World Heritage matters merely states (as of today)
"Following a public consultation, World Heritage for the Nation: Identifying, Protecting and Promoting Our World Heritage, the UK's Tentative List was reviewed. Applications were assessed by an independent Expert Panel and Ministers announced the new Tentative List in March 2011. The Expert Panel's Report can be found on this site. We intend to submit the new Tentative List formally to UNESCO shortly"
"Shortly" in terms of the speed with which government departments operate is likely to be longer than one might hope!!! Indeed one might have thought that, having announced it as long ago as March they might have tried to get it submitted in time for this year's WHC. The relevant WHC paper (WHC-11/35.COM/8A) shows a number of other states submitting new T List entries in April 2011 e.g Russia, Turkey, Argentina.

The form which has to be filled in requires that statements be made about OUV and criteria to be claimed as well as grid references etc etc (See Operational Guidelines paras 62-9 and annex 2 ) - so now doubt it will take the UK bureaucrats quite long time!! After all the Coalition government is carrying out "swingeing cuts" to the Civil Service so points have to be made!

Author elsslots
Admin
#27 | Posted: 14 Aug 2011 03:22 

Author Khuft
Partaker
#28 | Posted: 14 Aug 2011 07:21 
Maybe the delays are not so much due to the UK and the NL, but rather to the Parisian burocrats at UNESCO? The last tentative site added seems to have been the Austrian part of the Limes in early June. In July they were probably occupied with the follow-ups on the WHC session (which was end of June), and in August the most likely is that they are all on holidays.

Author elsslots
Admin
#29 | Posted: 27 Aug 2011 13:05 | Edited by: elsslots 
On September 10th, Dutch Open Monuments Day, the Van Nelle Factory will be open to the general public. The Van Nelle Factory in Rotterdam is one of the sites on the new Dutch T-List, and a good candidate to make it to the real List in one of the coming years.

I plan to visit it myself that day (first time). If some of you happen to be in the Netherlands (maybe because you live there...), we could meet and visit the factory together. There will be a guided tour. If you would like to do so, you can react here or send me an e-mail at els@worldheritagesite.org

See http://www.openmonumentendagrotterdam.nl/monumenten/46/ and http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/476/

Author winterkjm
Partaker
#30 | Posted: 28 Sep 2011 15:10 
Albania just added a new tentative site.

Natural and Cultural Heritage of the Ohrid Region

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