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Looking for a third site to make a complete connection

 
 
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Author elsslots
Admin
#91 | Posted: 18 Jun 2012 23:57 
Solivagant:
I have found third and fourth "connections" for Paper making.

very good! I've added the connection

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#92 | Posted: 10 Aug 2012 03:02 | Edited by: Solivagant 
I have been trying hard, but as yet unsuccessfully, to make a connection for different types of "lake". I started with

MARINE LAKES
A Marine lake is a landlocked water body which maintains a marine character through narrow submarine connections to the sea via fissures and underwater channels permitting only a weak exchange of water. According to the unique characteristics of each the degree of salinity and vertical stratification of the waters will vary. They "are exceptional ecosystems because they contain atypically small and isolated populations of divergent marine organisms that have inhabited peripheral, unusual, environments for at least many thousands of years.... These lakes are the marine analogs of the Galapagos Islands, the origins of modern evolutionary thought in terrestrial systems". See http://marine-lakes.blogspot.co.uk/p/marine-lakes.html

Rock Islands "the highest concentration of marine lakes in the world, which continue to yield new species discoveries" (UNESCO)
Ha Long Bay. Numerous e.g Hang Luong Lake; Me Cung Lake; Bui Xam Lake; Hang Du I Lake; Hang Du II Lake; Dau Be Lake; Cat Ba Lake; Hang Tham Lake. See http://www.poriferabrasil.mn.ufrj.br/iss/09-book/pdf/Azzini%20et%20al%20-%20Sponges%2 0of%20North%20Vietnam.pdf

BUT - I have been unable to find a third – there are some in Croatia, Philippines and Indonesia (Borneo and Papua) but not, apparently in any WHS. They occur in Karstitic coastal/island scenery

So I moved on to a different body of water whose definition I had come across when looking for more "Marine Lakes" – viz. Anchialine Pools. "Anchialine" = "Near the sea". I first found this definition "Anchialine ("near the sea") pools are rare and localized brackish waters along coastal lava flows that exhibit tidal fluctuations without a surface connection with the ocean". This emphasised "Coastal lava flows" because it was in an article about such pools in Hawaii - http://www.usgs.gov/ecosystems/pierc/files/factsheets/pools.pdf . However, further articles make it clear that such pools exist in other than Volcanic areas – particularly Karst. So there is an overlap with "Marine Lake" but the lake/pool HAS to be "brackish" ("Technically, brackish water contains between 0.5 and 30 grams of salt per litre—more often expressed as 0.5 to 30 parts per thousand (ppt or ‰). Thus, brackish covers a range of salinity regimes and is not considered a precisely defined condition. It is characteristic of many brackish surface waters that their salinity can vary considerably over space and/or time) which "Marine Lakes" don't have to be. It also appears that the bodies of water described as "Anchialine" can be much smaller than "Lakes" and include "pools" and "caves".

ANCHIALINE POOLS
"An anchialine pool is a landlocked body of water with a subterranean connection to the ocean. Anchialine pools are a feature of coastal aquifers which are density stratified, with the water near the surface being fresh or brackish, and saline water intruding from the coast below at some depth."

Hawaii Volcanoes NP See http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/pacn/monitoring/vs_anchialine_pool.cfm
Ningaloo Coast
"An unprepossessing exterior protects the secrets of Bundera Sinkhole; a closer look over its rocky edge reveals aquamarine waters and a wealth of anchialine life" (Nom File).

Again I have, so far, only been able to find 2 WHS with such pools. It appears that the Yucatan aquifer is an example of this type of hydrology with fresh water floating on saline - "The whole aquifer (of Yucatan) is therefore an anchialine system (i.e., one that is land-locked, but connected to an ocean). Where a cenote, or the flooded cave to which it is an opening, provides deep enough access into the aquifer, then the interface between the fresh and saline water may be reached". However, I cannot discover any quote to show that the inscribed cenotes of Chichen Itza are this deep

But yet another Hydrological term for a "type" of water body had come up – namely Meromictic Lakes. "Meromictic" = "Of or pertaining to a lake whose water is permanently stratified and therefore does not circulate completely throughout the basin at any time during the year." This term only has a partial overlap with the earlier 2 since "Meromictic" doesn't relate specifically to salinity or the sea and stratification of saline water is just one example of "Meromixis" – so, for instance as in the case of Lake Cadagno in Switzerland, it can occur at an altitude of 2000m in the Alps and relate to other dissolved salts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Cadagno .

MEROMICTIC LAKES
Rock Islands - Jellyfish Lake on Mecherchar http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jellyfish_Lake
Tasmanian Wilderness - Lake Fidler http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Fidler_(Tasmania)

Again I have not yet found a third. So, whilst I may have become more knowledgeable about Hydrology and Limnology etc, the exercise has failed to turn up a single connection from these 3 potentials! Can anyone else succeed!! I think the latter 2 offer the best chance.

PS.
Reading thorugh the quoted article above about the Marine Lakes of Ha Long Bay i note that some of them have the word "Anchialine" applied to them - but this seems to relate to a condition which occurs during the monsoon rather than as a permanent condition and this probably precludes them being described as fully Anchialine. If we ever do complete a connection for Anchialinne and Mermicitc is might be worth adding the requirement "Permanent" for the condition.

Author winterkjm
Partaker
#93 | Posted: 10 Aug 2012 04:35 | Edited by: winterkjm 
Everglades National Park might be the 3rd site you are looking for. Just from looking at the park map I see Mud Lake, Bear Lake, West Lake, and Nine Mile Pond. I've been to some of these areas and often the water was brackish. You might have to do a bit more research to confirm this fits your connection.

Quote from AB Evaluation

This quote touches on what your looking for, but it lacks clarity on actual lakes. West Lake is brackish and certainly felt like a small lake to me, and not a glade.

The park lies at the interface between temperate and subtropical
America and between fresh and brackish water, shallow bays and deeper coastal
waters, thus creating a complex of habitats supporting a high diversity of flora and
fauna. The area of transition from freshwater (glades) to saltwater (mangrove) is a
highly productive zone that incubates great numbers of economically valuable
crustacea.


From the nomination file:

In addition to the terrestrial systems, there are at least four distinctively different aquatic community types within the park: The inland fresh water areas consisting of broad, shallow grassy rivers, small scattered ponds, and alligator holes; the brackish water or estuarine areas where fresh and salt water merge; shallow shoreline and offshore embayments; and, the deeper gulf coastal waters.

Lakes are as far as I know are not mentioned. Yet many of these "shallow ponds" are named lakes on the map. If you look at the park map in the nomination file there are numerous coastal enclosed bodies of waters that could be considered lakes by their size.

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#94 | Posted: 10 Aug 2012 05:28 | Edited by: Solivagant 
winterkjm:
Everglades National Park might be the 3rd site you are looking for.

Thanks winterkjm. I haven't yet managed to confirm Everglades for any of the Hydrological connections but HAVE found a third for Anchialine

Galapagos
See http://www.tamug.edu/cavebiology/reprints/Reprint-68.pdf

This article also has a useful definition of Anchialine
"First proposed 1973 to describe pools with no surface connection to the sea containing salt or brackish water which fluctuates with the tides". Further defined in 1986 as "bodies of haline water usually with a restricted exposure to the open air, always with more or less extensive subterranean connections to the sea and showing noticeable marine as well as terrestrial influences". Anchialine habitats include landlocked open pools, similar pools in the interior of caves and entirely submerged cave passages"

I suggest we adopt the definition in bold italic above and title the Connection "Anchialine Habitats" since the most important thing about them is the fact that they are a habitat for a specialised fauna
The 3 sites are
Galapagos
Ningaloo
Hawaii Volcanoes
with references as above

Author paul
Partaker
#95 | Posted: 10 Aug 2012 06:47 
There are definitely anchialine environments in Quintana Roo - the following publication is referenced frequently

An annotated list of the troglobitic anchialine and freshwater fauna of Quintana Roo. In D. Navarro and E. Suarez, eds. Diversidad Biologica en la Reserva de la Biosfera de Sian Ka'an Quintana Roo, Mexico. Commision Nacional para la Biodiversidad y CIGRO, Mexico 2:197-215.

which suggests that Sian Ka'an contains some.

What am I doing???? I have a deadline!

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#96 | Posted: 11 Aug 2012 01:40 | Edited by: Solivagant 
paul:
which suggests that Sian Ka'an contains some.


The entire Aquifer of Yucatan is considered "Anchialine" and the coastal area of Qunitana Roo is, apparently, famous for Cenote dives which reach the Holocline where surface fresh water is replaced by saline. A number of these caves contain specialised and even unique species.

BUT
I am still unable to find any direct reference to such locations within Sian Ka'an and the UNESCO data for Sian Ka'an is rather thin, particularly lacking a Nomination File. The IUCN evaluation doesn't mention any caves etc as far as I can see, though it has plenty on Reefs, Lagoons and Mangroves!

One famous diving Cenote is Cenote Angelita wihch lies south of Tulum towards Sian Ka'an - but not inside. This comprehensive Web site lists all the Cenotes/Cave systems of the state and somehing about the specialised fauna. Some of the Cenotes on the very long list might be in Sian Ka'an but it doesn't say so
http://www.caves.org/project/qrss/qrss.htm

Author Durian
Partaker
#97 | Posted: 2 Jul 2013 23:15 
Assif:
Ice caves: Halstatt, Slovak Carst, ??


Very close! Fujisan's Narusawa Ice Cave is located in the buffer zone, just few kms from the core zone!

Author elsslots
Admin
#98 | Posted: 1 Oct 2013 08:10 
Hanging Coffins:
1. Mount Wuyi
2. China Danxia - Longhushan
3. .... ???

Author Assif
Partaker
#99 | Posted: 3 Jul 2018 17:54 
Laboratories:

Ivrea - Centro Studi ed Esperienze Olivetti
Fray Bentos - laboratorio Liebig
??

Author Colvin
Partaker
#100 | Posted: 4 Jul 2018 00:05 
How are you defining laboratories, Assif? Are you looking for someplace strictly defined as a laboratory, or as a place where scientific experiments and discoveries were made? If the latter, Blaenavon Ironworks in the Blaenavon Industrial Landscape is where Percy Gilchrist and Sidney Gilchrist Thomas created a process to remove phosphorus from iron ore to make a stronger steel. This revolutionized the steel industry in Europe.

Author elsslots
Admin
#101 | Posted: 4 Jul 2018 12:13 | Edited by: elsslots 
Colvin:
If the latter, Blaenavon Ironworks in the Blaenavon Industrial Landscape is where Percy Gilchrist and Sidney Gilchrist Thomas created a process to remove phosphorus from iron ore to make a stronger steel. This revolutionized the steel industry in Europe

I think this fits better with the already existing connection https://www.worldheritagesite.org/connection/Scientific+Developments
A third for that could be Chaine des Puys: In 1875, a physics laboratory was built at the summit. (wiki)

In that case, the connection Laboratories can become about strictly defined labs.

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#102 | Posted: 4 Jul 2018 12:39 | Edited by: Solivagant 
elsslots:
In that case, the connection Laboratories can become about strictly defined labs.

Many factories are going to have a "Laboratory" for testing and/or R&D - but do we want to list all of them!!!! For all I know Van Nelliefabrik and Fagus have one somewhere!!
Virtually ALL universities are going to have at least 1 "Laboratory" and many WHS include a University.
Many other "Scientific" sites are going to have a "Laboratory"
I just checked Kew Gardens - it has
a. Jodrell Laboratory - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kew_Gardens#Jodrell_Laboratory
b. Plant and Fungal Small Molecule Analysis Laboratory

If we are going to have then suggest only "historic" ones which contribute to the OUV??

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#103 | Posted: 6 Jul 2018 01:57 | Edited by: Solivagant 
Solivagant:
If we are going to have then suggest only "historic" ones which contribute to the OUV??

Another "Historic Laboratory" -
One of the St Petersburg "locations" is "Scientific Town-Institution of Physiologist I.P.Pavlov "
This is located out to the east of the city in the area of Koltushi (as shown on our map)
See - http://www.infran.ru/labs/Center-Samoilov_eng.htm
and
https://www.unknownpavlov.com/biological-station-in-koltushi-
For some reason despite re-copying and re-pasting and re-checking - this link isn't working. Instead click on first returned site from this Google query!!
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=biological+station+in+koltushi&oq=biological+statio n+in+koltushi&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60.8205j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Or "Scientific Developments" ?? I will leave Els to decide how to differentiate between these - it could be that we just include Laboratories within it as many Labs are likely to cover both if they really "add OUV" e.g - "In Koltushi Ivan Petrovich discovered and described the phenomenon of conditioned reflex." From 2nd link above)

And did any "scientific developments" actually take place in the Olivetti Institute?? Perhaps "Research Laboratory/centre" would be better then simply "laboratory" as it would also exclude the "mundane" laboratories doing "run of the mill" testing. Would need to exclude Observatories - research takes place there but they are already included in Astronomy.

Author Assif
Partaker
#104 | Posted: 6 Jul 2018 13:08 
Solivagant:
If we are going to have then suggest only "historic" ones which contribute to the OUV??

Historic ones that are related to the OUV, I would say. They do not have to be so important as to be one of the main reasons for the OUV, it is sufficient for them to be of the same time and purpose as the original WHS.

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#105 | Posted: 6 Jul 2018 13:40 | Edited by: Solivagant 
Assif:
Historic ones that are related to the OUV, I would say. They do not have to be so important as to be one of the main reasons for the OUV, it is sufficient for them to be of the same time and purpose as the original WHS.

So - to talk specifics
UNAM apparently has 32 Laboratories - http://sitios.iingen.unam.mx/IIUNAMEnglish/Labs.html
How would you see them?
My view would be - not relevant. UNAM was inscribed primarily for its architecture - unless an important/significant example relating to a particular Laboratory can be found .
Kew - Jodrell Lab - Historic and relevant to Kew's historic role
St Petersburg - Pavlov Lab - the location was specifically selected by Russia. So relevant
Ivrea - Relevant both to period architecture and "role of Olivetti" which the ensemble represents
Fray Bentos - I am not sure. Your view??

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