World Heritage Site

for World Heritage Travellers



Forum: Start | Profile | Search |         Website: Start | The List | Community |
Connections www.worldheritagesite.org Forum / Connections /  
 

Connection suggestion

 
 
Page  Page 25 of 33:  « Previous  1  ...  24  25  26  ...  32  33  Next »

Author Jurre
Partaker
#361 | Posted: 7 Aug 2021 19:18 | Edited by: Jurre 
Connection: Tombs

Arslantepe Mound - At the end of Period VIB1 (3100-3000 BC), a "royal" cist grave was found on the margins of the tell, with very rich funerary gifts, among which 75 metal objects, weapons, tools, vessels and jewellery in copper, silver, gold and various alloys. (Nomination Text, p. 27)

Connection: Human Sacrifice

Arslantepe Mound - A "royal" cist grave was found on the margins of the tell, with very rich funerary gifts (...). On top of the cist grave, 4 adolescents were probably sacrificed, constituting one of the earliest evidences of a human sacrifice. (Nomination Text, p. 27)

Connection: Iron Age

Arslantepe Mound - Excavations began in the 1930s, conducted by a French mission headed by L. Delaporte. By investigating the upper part of the mound, Delaporte unearthed the remains of remarkable Iron Age buildings, among which the so-called neo-Assyrian palace (7th century BC) and the well-known Lions' Gate (9th-8th centuries BC). (Nomination Text, p. 37)

Connection: Gates depicting Lions

Arslantepe Mound - Excavations (...) unearthed the remains of remarkable Iron Age buildings, among which (...) the well-known Lions' Gate (9th-8th centuries BC). The gate was flanked on either side by two lion statues carved from stone blocks with high relief bodies and round heads, which probably gave the name to the site (Arslan Tepe, namely, "Lions ' Hill") (...). (Nomination Text, p. 37)

Author Jurre
Partaker
#362 | Posted: 8 Aug 2021 06:16 | Edited by: Jurre 
Connection: Located in a Former Capital

Arslantepe Mound - Arslantepe was the capital of the autonomous Neo-Hittite kingdom of Melid/Malatya (Iron Age, 1100-712). (Nomination Text, p. 54)

Connection: Protective Shelters

Arslantepe Mound - The site has been protected with an innovative roofing system. (Nomination Text, p. 56)

Connection: Bronze Age Collapse

Arslantepe Mound - Arslantepe is a testimony of the Bronze Age Collapse, as recent investigations have brought to light an interesting transitional phase following the collapse of the Hittite Empire in Central Anatolia and preceding the foundation of the Neo-Hittite kingdom of Arslantepe/Melid. The Hittite citadel was probably destroyed after the collapse of the empire but, between the end of the 2nd and the beginning of the 1st millennia BC, a new huge town-wall was built. (Nomination Text, p. 31, 53-54)

Author Assif
Partaker
#363 | Posted: 8 Aug 2021 18:03 | Edited by: Assif 
elsslots:
Sydney Opera House: "shells" in the roof
Chilehaus: "The Chilehaus building is famed for its top, which is reminiscent of a ship's prow"
Atlantida Church: are these waves?

Yes, I meant the waves in Atlantida.
Sprinkenhof (Hamburg): I can't find any sources, but there are many maritime motives on the facade. I will take some pictures next time I am there.
@Khuft: As we already have a connection for the Manueline style maybe shouldn't we better restrict the connection to modern architecture?

Author Solivagant
Partaker
#364 | Posted: 9 Aug 2021 03:03 | Edited by: Solivagant 
elsslots:
Assif:
A proposal for a new connection: prevalent marine motives
Atlantida, Sydney Opera, Hamburg (Chilehaus, Sprinkenhof)

Out of genuine interest - is there any evidence of a "marine" inspiration for the Sydney Opera House design?
Certainly "post hoc" it is frequently linked to the sails of ships but were they (or sea shells) in Utzen's mind at the time of the design?
His father was a marine architect, so one might have thought that could be the case but, as far as I am aware in all his writings and interviews on the subject of his "inspiration" that hasn't been mentioned. And the word "Shell" is surely used as a specific architectural term in this case whose origin could just as easily be a peeled orange or an egg shell as a marine mollusc!
This article contains Utzen's drawings, writings and interviews - perhaps surprisingly the 2 structures cited by Utzen as inspirations are Kronborg Castle and Tikal!! He refers to the inspiration of natural shapes such as leaves and clouds... but never to sea shells or even to sails and seems to have been far more interested in the roofs as sculptural forms and in their mathematics.. The one exception in this article is a drawing titled "Juxtaposition of a boat and the final roof scheme" but that could be a post hoc rationalisation. The article also shows how much the shape of the roofs changed (becoming more vertical) during the final design phases away from Utzen's earlier ideas.
Of course the "connection" could still be justified on the basis of the "Sails" motif which people have subsequently assigned to the building as opposed to that of the architect... whatever that was.

Author Jasam
Partaker
#365 | Posted: 9 Aug 2021 10:36 
Following this year's session, a few ones off the top of my head:
Art Deco: Great Spa Towns of Europe: Vichy: Église Saint-Blaise et Notre-Dame-des-Malades; Petit Casino
Astronomy and Astrology: Paseo del Prado and Buen Retiro: Real Observatorio de Madrid
Theatres: Nice: Opéra de Nice
Exact locations inscribed twice (or more): Paris, Banks of the Seine: tour Saint-Jacques, also part of "Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France," in the revised core zone

Author Assif
Partaker
#366 | Posted: 9 Aug 2021 18:45 
Jewish culture: Nice: synagogue
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synagogue_de_Nice
Roman colonies: Nice Cimiez (Cemenelum)
Baths: Nice Cimiez
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermes_romains_de_Cimiez
Locations for playing sports: Nice: Cimiez
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arènes_de_Cimiez
Twin towns: Nice: Nice and Cimiez
Cemenelum was an important rival of Nice, continuing to exist as a separate city till the time of the Lombard invasions. (Wiki)
Moorish revival: Nice: Hotel Alhambra
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alhambra_(Nice)

Author meltwaterfalls
Partaker
#367 | Posted: 10 Aug 2021 11:19 | Edited by: meltwaterfalls 
Solivagant:
This article contains Utzen's drawings, writings and interviews - perhaps surprisingly the 2 structures cited by Utzen as inspirations are Kronborg Castle and Tikal

Thank you for flagging up that article Solivagant, it was fascinating. Also I had no idea that the pedestall on which it sits draws inspiration from Monte Alban (mistakenly described as being in Yucatan in the notes).

As there are 3 WHS specifically named by Utzon as inspiration for the Opera House perhaps that means it is a new connection in and of itself? (Kronberg Castle, Tikal and Oaxaca/ Monte Alban)

In terms of hard evidence of the shell influence I don't have much to add. Like Solivagant I had always seen the sail and shell inspiration as something of a post hoc rationalisation, but have nothing firm to pin that on. But I wouldn't have a strong objection to it being included in the connection just on the basis of those well established ideas, even if they weren't at the forefront of Utzon's thinking.

Whilst searching I came across this which had 7 of the alternative propossals for the Opera House. I quite like Paul Boissevain and Barbara Osmond one, but I would be very confident in saying none of these would be WHS if they were built, Utzon's design is rather special.

Author Assif
Partaker
#368 | Posted: 10 Aug 2021 18:10 | Edited by: Assif 
Biodiversity hotspot: Colchis: Caucausus
Inscribed significantly for a Work of Fine Art by a single artist: Padua: Giotto

Author Michael Turtle
Partaker
#369 | Posted: 11 Aug 2021 19:46 | Edited by: Michael Turtle 
meltwaterfalls
Solivagant
There was a very interesting article quite a few years ago where Utzon "broke his silence" and talked about the Sydney Opera House. To your point on the inspiration, he is directly quoted as saying:

"Many people say my design was inspired by the sailing yachts in the harbour or by seashells. This is not the case. It is like an orange, you peel an orange and you get these segments, these similar shapes. It was like this in my models."
"It was not that I thought it should be like sails in the harbour. It just so happened that the white sails were similar. l was influenced by the sails only to the extent that my father was a naval architect and l was familiar with big shapes."
"I had never seen Sydney Harbour when I made this design, although I felt quite familiar with it from photographs and naval charts. l was taken very much by the Sydney Heads and I thought if I could keep people up on top, where they took their performance and their intermission, it (the Opera House) could be another Head. In this I was influenced by the Mayan pyramids at Chichen ltza in Mexico."
"The Mayans made these platforms exactly the same height as the roof of the jungle and then they lived in another world, eight metres above the other one. I had this in mind for the Opera House."
"We also wanted to create a relationship between the shells and the interior halls so it would be in harmony, like when you opened a walnut. The reason for the tiles on the roof is that the building was to reflect the mood of the harbour."
"We thought white would be good because of the colours it would make and reflect from all the red roofs of the houses around the harbour. I got this idea [of reflected colour] while swimming on the Barrier Reef."
"It is fine that people find what things are from what they see. Of course, they are like sails but this is not what we meant here, but I am very happy people think this."
The full article is here: https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/utzon-breaks-his-silence-20140904-10c93e.html

The idea of the Opera House sails representing shells has become more popular in recent time because of the link to the original use of the site - it was here that Indigenous people gathered for events (which including performances) and, as they ate shellfish, they would throw the shells aside to create middens. As Utzon has said in the quoted article, this wasn't his intention, but people can interpret it this way, if they like. The first part of this article has a bit more information about this topic: https://www.sydneyoperahouse.com/our-story/sydney-opera-house-history/tubowgule.html

Author Assif
Partaker
#370 | Posted: 12 Aug 2021 17:12 
Extended from original TWHS: Padua: Cappella degli scrovegni (2006)
Sphinxes: Padua: two Egyptian sphinxes in Palazzo della Ragione
Astrology and astronomy: Padua: astrological depictions of the months in Palazzo della Ragione
Tombs: Padua: St. Anthony's tomb at the Basilica of St. Anthony
Religious relics: Padua: St. Anthony's chin and tongue at the Basilica of St. Anthony
Mausolea: Padua: Antonio Roselli and Alessandro Contarini, both at the Basilica of St. Anthony
Equestrian statues: Padua: Gattamelata at the Basilica of St. Anthony
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilika_des_Heiligen_Antonius_(Padua)#/media/Datei:Gattamelata.jpg
Damaged in World War II Padova: most of Mantegna'a frescoes at the Ovetari Chapel (Eremitani)
Augustinian: Padova: Eremitani

Author meltwaterfalls
Partaker
#371 | Posted: 12 Aug 2021 17:19 
Michael Turtle:
Many people say my design was inspired by the sailing yachts in the harbour or by seashells. This is not the case.

Well that is pretty clear.

Thanks for the SMH link Michael, I've rather enjoyed learning more about teh Opera house over the last few days.

Best of luck with the book launch as well.

Author Assif
Partaker
#372 | Posted: 12 Aug 2021 17:28 
Destroyed in an invasion: Chankillo: Chankillo and other structures of the Casma/Sechin culture were partially destroyed and their use abandoned in an apparent conflict about 100 BCE. (Wiki)
Pacific Ocean: Chinchorro

Author elsslots
Admin
#373 | Posted: 13 Aug 2021 03:13 
Assif:
Mausolea: Padua: Antonio Roselli and Alessandro Contarini, both at the Basilica of St. Anthony

Do you have a link for this? Is it really a mausoleum or more of a set of decorated tombs

Have added the others, thanks.

Author Assif
Partaker
#374 | Posted: 13 Aug 2021 06:41 | Edited by: Assif 
elsslots:
Assif:
Mausolea: Padua: Antonio Roselli and Alessandro Contarini, both at the Basilica of St. Anthony

Do you have a link for this? Is it really a mausoleum or more of a set of decorated tombs

Have added the others, thanks.

https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilica_di_Sant%27Antonio_di_Padova#Mausoleo_ad_Antonio_Roselli

Author Assif
Partaker
#375 | Posted: 13 Aug 2021 07:11 
Extended from original TWHS: Sudanese style mosques: Kong (1987)
Vernacular architecture: Sudanese style mosques
Earth architecture: Sudanese style mosques

Trans-Saharan trade routes: Sudanese style mosques: The mosques "present highly important testimonies to the trans-Saharan trade that facilitated the expansion of Islam and Islamic culture". (Unesco)
Cultural sites taking up an entire island: Petrogylphs of Lake Onega and the White Sea: Peri Nos islands
Uninhabited islands: Petrogylphs of Lake Onega and the White Sea: Peri Nos islands
Hermitage Museum: Petrogylphs of Lake Onega and the White Sea: A rock covered by petroglyphs from Peri Nos III
Hydro power station: Petrogylphs of Lake Onega and the White Sea: . During the construction of the Vygostrovskaya Hydroelectric Power Station, a dam was constructed. It buried the southern group of the petroglyphs of Besovy Sledki discovered by V.I. Ravdonikas in 1936. (nom file)

Page  Page 25 of 33:  « Previous  1  ...  24  25  26  ...  32  33  Next » 
Connections www.worldheritagesite.org Forum / Connections /
 Connection suggestion

Your Reply Click this icon to move up to the quoted message


 ?
Only registered users are allowed to post here. Please, enter your username/password details upon posting a message, or register first.

 
 
 
www.worldheritagesite.org Forum Powered by Chat Forum Software miniBB ®
 ⇑