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Author Zoe
Partaker
#61 | Posted: 21 Dec 2019 20:56 
@Els
Mexico is rolling out the G series peso and ALL will have a WHS (20 is being phased out).I hadn't noticed until I got a new 200 note.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_peso

Author elsslots
Admin
#62 | Posted: 22 Dec 2019 00:24 | Edited by: elsslots 
Thanks for reporting them! I've added them to the connection On Banknotes.

Author elsslots
Admin
#63 | Posted: 14 Mar 2020 04:45 | Edited by: elsslots 
Esteban Cervantes Jiménez yesterday sent me a tremendous update on the connections for the "Historic Centre of Mexico City and Xochimilco". I will add them of course, but like to present them in this topic as well as it points out so many more interesting places to see in that great city.

1. Connection: Baroque
Proposal: As the capital of the "Virreinato de Nueva España" and known as the "City of Palaces" during the apogee of Baroque, the historic centre of Mexico City is full of ecclesiastical and civil jewels of baroque, as:

· Catedral Metropolitana de la Asunción de la Santísima Virgen María: its construction started in 1571 and ended in 1813, therefore having a mix of consecutive architectural styles, but Baroque is considered the most prominent. At Plaza de la Constitución S/N.
· La Profesa, Oratory of San Felipe Neri: at Isabel La Católica #21. Concluded in neoclassical style by Manuel Tolsá.
· Chapel of Nuestra Señora del Pilar (la Enseñanza): at Donceles #102.
· Temple and fmr. convent of Santa Inés: at Moneda #26.
· Church and fmr. convent of San Francisco: At Francisco I. Madero #7.
· Church of Santo Domingo: Belisario Rodríguez S/N.
· Church of Santa Teresa la Antigua: above Capilla del Cristo. At Licenciado Verdad #8.
· Church and Convent of Jesús María: at Jesús María #39.
· Church of San Lorenzo Diácono y Mártir: at Belisario Domínguez #28.
· Church of the Inmaculada Concepción: of a more subdued baroque style, at Belisario Domínguez #3.
· Parish of Santa Catarina: at República de Brasil.
· Fmr. Temple of San Agustín: at República de El Salvador #76.
· Museo Nacional de las Culturas: at Moneda #13 (behind the National Palace).
· Church de la Santísima Trinidad: at Emiliano Zapata #60.
· Church of San Bernardo: at 20 de noviembre #33.
· Museo de la Secretaría de Hacienda y Crédito Público: at Moneda #4.
· Casa del Marqués de Prado Alegre: at Francisco I. Madero #39.
· Palacio de los Condes de San Mateo de Valparaíso: at Isabel La Católica #44.
· Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso: at Justo Sierra #16.
· Palacio de la Escuela de Medicina: at República de Brasil #33. Initially the Palace of the Inquisition in the city, built 1732-1736.
Source(s): https://www.lamudi.com.mx/journal/la-arquitectura-barroca-en-mexico/ ; https://mxcity.mx/2017/12/algunas-joyas-barrocas-de-la-ciudad-de-mexico-parte-1/
; https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor%C3%ADa:Iglesias_barrocas_de_M%C3%A9xico

2. Connection: Neoclassical Architecture
Proposal: At the end of the colonial period and during roughly the first century of its independent life, the historic centre of the city received numerous works in the neoclassical style. Just like in many other countries, this style was used to relate the new nation and its surging institutions to the glories of the Democracy of Athens and the Republic of Rome.
Examples:
· Catedral Metropolitana de la Asunción de la Virgen María: as it was ended in 1813, when the neoclassical style was becoming widely adopted. These neoclassical works were developed by Architect Manuel Tolsá, who built the clock tower and the dome of the cathedral. At Plaza de la Constitución S/N.
· Church of Nuestra Señora de Loreto: at San Ildefonso 80.
· La Profesa, Oratory of San Felipe Neri: at Isabel La Católica 21. Concluded in neoclassical style by Manuel Tolsá.
· Palacio de Minería: also by Manuel Tolsá, at Tacuba #5
· Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL): at Tacuba #8. Initially the seat of the "Secretaria de Comunicaciones y Obras Públicas"
· Carlos the IV statue or "El Caballito".
· Teatro de la Ciudad Esperanza Iris: by Ignacio Capetillo Servín and Federico Mariscal, at Donceles #36.
· Hemiciclo de Juárez: at Alameda Central Park.
· Palacio de Bellas Artes: by Ádamo Boari, as was typical in the period, the building is very eclectic, but neoclassicism may be considered the predominant style. At Juárez Av. S/N
· Antigua Escuela de Economía: at República de Economía #92. By architect Manuel Gorozpe.
Source(s): https://mxcity.mx/2018/05/algunas-joyas-neoclasicas-de-la-ciudad-de-mexico/

3. Connection: Domes
Proposal: The following is a list of the most important domes in the historic centre.
Examples:
· Palacio de Bellas Artes: by architect Ádamo Boari, at Juárez av. S/N.
· Church and fmr. convent of San Francisco: At Francisco I. Madero #7.
· Catedral Metropolitana de la Asunción de la Virgen Maria: neoclassical dome. At Plaza de la Constitución S/N.
· La Profesa, Oratory of San Felipe Neri: at Isabel La Católica 21. Concluded in neoclassical style by Manuel Tolsá.
· Temple and fmr. convent of the Carmen: at República de Nicaragua S/N.
· Church of Santo Domingo: Belisario Rodríguez S/N.
· Church of Santa Teresa la Antigua: above Capilla del Cristo. At Licenciado Verdad 8.
· Church and Convent of Jesús María: at Jesús María 39.
· Church of San Lorenzo Diácono y Mártir: at Belisario Domínguez 28.
· Church of the Inmaculada Concepción: at Belisario Domínguez 3.
· Temple and fmr. convent of Santa Inés: at Moneda 26.
· Church of Nuestra Señora de Loreto: at San Ildefonso 80.
· Church of San Bernardo: at 20 de noviembre 33.
· Fmr. Temple of San Agustín: at República de El Salvador 76.
· Palacio de la Autonomía de la UNAM: at Primo de Verdad 2.
Source(s): https://mxcity.mx/2017/01/las-cupulas-mas-hermosas-de-la-ciudad-de-mexico-fotos/

4. Connection: Italian Architects outside Italy
Proposal:
Examples:
· Palacio de Bellas Artes: by architect Ádamo Boari, at Juárez av. S/N. The building also has sculptures by Leonardo Bistolfi, Edoardo Rubino or Alessandro Mazzucotelli.
· Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL): by Silvio Contri, at Tacuba #8
· Palacio Postal: by Ádamo Boari, at Tacuba 1. One of the most significant and sumptuous buildings from the times of the Porfiriato.
Source(s): http://www.istitutoeuroarabo.it/DM/italianos-en-mexico-arquitectos-ingenieros-y-artistas-entre-los-siglos-xix-y-xx/

5. Connection: Modern Urban Planning
Proposal:
It is proposed that Neoclassical urbanism started in 1775 when Bucarelli ordered the opening of the Bulevar Nuevo, and ends in 1849.
Of particular interest is the period starting with the empire of Maximilian of Habsburg in 1861 and ending with beginning of the Porfiriato dictatorship in 1876, when the ideas coming from Europe (Haussmann for example) were beginning to be applied, to break the dominance of the historic centre and of Zocalo square in particular, creating a urban duality. Also, the results of the "desamortización" laws resulted in the elimination of conventual properties and urban development where they were located.
However, the most important period is the Porfiariato dictatorship (1876-1910) when the ideas of new urbanism were fully applied, with the creation of Paseo de la Reforma, the construction of monuments (directed at promoting the nationalist spirit), the expansion of the city (creation of neighborhoods to the west and south) incorporating such principles and a focus on hygienism, that led to the creation of related infrastructure.
During this period, with the influx of European professionals and the full application of principles of Neoclassical Urbanism, the city was transformed from its colonial character.
Examples:
· Alameda Central: of Colonial origins, but totally renovated during the Porfiriato. The Hemiciclo Juárez, created to celebrate the "national glories" is from this period, too.
· A small section of Paseo de la Reforma.
· Palacio de Bellas Artes: started during this historical period.
Source(s): (very interesting compendium of Neoclassical urbanism in Mexico city): https://books.openedition.org/cemca/4077?lang=es
http://urbanisticka.blogspot.com/2009/08/urbanismo-mexicano-siglos-xviii-y-xix.html
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alameda_Central

6. Connection: Historical Cafés
Proposal:
Examples:
· Café de Tacuba: 1912;at Calle de Tacuba #18.
· Café La Blanca: 1915; at Av. 5 de mayo #40.
Source (s): https://travesiasdigital.com/mexico/cafes-historicos-del-centro-de-ciudad-de-mexico-para-sentir-la-capital

7. Connection: Historical Organs
Proposal:
Examples:
· Catedral Metropolitana de la Asunción de la Virgen María: two organs, finished in 1736, damaged in a fire in 1967 and restored between 2007 and 2013. Each one has 3.350 pipes.
Source(s): https://mxcity.mx/2019/04/la-historia-de-los-majestuosos-organos-de-la-catedral-metropolitana-fotos/

8. Connection: Notable Hotels
Proposal: The requirement that the building must have been designed as a hotel and be still functioning excludes the Gran Hotel (which was not designed as such), however there are others which may apply. The no longer standing (and sadly famous) Hotel Regis and Hotel del Prado were just besides what became the inscribed WH (and therefore, were not inside it).

Examples:
· Hotel de Cortés: opened 1620 as a hostel for Augustinian friars, initially known as "Hostería Santo Tomás de Villanueva". It was later a residential complex (vecindad), but later became a hotel again. In 1948, it hosted Simone de Beauvoir. At Avenida Hidalgo 85.
· Hotel Gillow: opened 1876, o

Author elsslots
Admin
#64 | Posted: 14 Mar 2020 04:46 | Edited by: elsslots 
9. Connection: Bandstand
Proposal: As most public parks in Mexico and Latin America, there is a bandstand at Alameda Central, where besides musical presentations, boys and girls of middle to high class origins used to socialize.

Example:
· Kiosk at Alameda Central. At 06000 Hidalgo.
Source(s): https://www.cultura.cdmx.gob.mx/comunicacion/nota/1151-19

10. Connection: Damaged by Earthquake
Proposal: Of course, the 1985 is already considered in this connection, I am just proposing to add four other seismic events that damaged or destroyed buildings within the limits of the Historic Centre, especially the strongest one.

Example:
· September 19, 2017: 1 abandoned two-storey building (the one at Mina 16 and 2 de Abril) collapsed within the inscribed area. Additionally, there is one where "major damage" is indicated at República Argentina 38. The map https://elpais.com/internacional/2017/09/20/actualidad/1505878624_127199.html shows that 5 others were "damaged".
· April 21, 1776: with an epicenter near Acapulco, the La Accorded jail collapsed, the Mint, the Cathedral, the National Palace, the Bishop's Palace, among others, were damaged. It lasted 4 minutes.
· March 28, 1787 or San Sixto's: probably the most potent to rock Mexico (magnitude 8,6 Richter), with an epicenter in the coast of Guerrero and Oaxaca. It lasted 5-6 minutes and "a good part of the city from the XVI and XVII centuries had to be demolished". This Earthquake also devastated the city of Oaxaca.
· 9 Cane of 1475: During the reign of Axayácatl, an earthquake left in ruins most of the buildings in the Anahuac valley, seriously damaging the temples and teocallis in Tenochtitlan, making the chinampas "sink", mountains collapse and producing a tsunami in the Texcoco lake.
Source(s): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terremoto_de_Tenochtitlan_de_1475
https://www.nexos.com.mx/?p=34349 (very interesting)

11. Connection: Contains significant structures from the 20th century
Example:
· Torre Latinoamericana: built 1948-1956 and with 182 meters, it was the highest building of Latin America between 1956 and 1960 and stood out when built for its anti-seismic design. It is also considered a masterpiece of "International Style" in the region. At Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas 2.
Source(s): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torre_Latinoamericana

12. Connection: Contains significant structures from the 21th century
Example:
· Museo Memoria y Tolerancia: built 2006-2010, designed by architects Arditti+RDT, just south of the Palacio de Bellas Artes and with the role of presenting, sensitizing the population against genocides of the XX-XXI Centuries, as well as promoting tolerance. At Avenida Juárez 8.
Source(s): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museo_Memoria_y_Tolerancia

13. Connection: LGBTQ Culture
The historical event is very important in the history of the LGBTI community in Mexico and of the Porfiriato period but the most important parts of it didn't take place in the historical center, just a few blocks away.

Proposal: Though homosexuality had been decriminalized in 1871 in Mexico (as a result of the adoption of the Napoleonic code), police raids still happened. In the early morning of November 18, 1901, in a very historic raid, 42 gay men were detained at a private dance in a house at the elegant Colonia Tabacalera, at what now is Ezequiel Montes street (just 8 blocks west from the limit of the WHS), with the half of them clad in women's clothes.

The official report was of only 41 men, which led to a highly prevalent rumor that there was a 42th man, and that he was Ignacio de la Torre y Mier, son-in-law of dictator Porfirio Díaz. The official reports also indicated that the men were detained in the jail (located at the crossing of Chapultepec and Balderas streets, just some blocks west of the southwestern corner of the WHS), forced to sweep the streets still in their party clothes and later sent to do forced labor in Yucatán, where a war against the Mayans was being fought.

The significance of the event was high because -even when no names were revealed- it was widely rumored that many of those present were from the highest strata of society, that those sent to Yucatán were only the participants who hadn't been able to pay for their freedom (therefore showing the corruption of the regime) and because it launched to the public opinion -although under a very negative light- a subject that was totally a taboo.

In the last decades, the event has been vindicated by the Mexican LGBTI community as a very early step in the fight for equality.

Example:
· Currently there is a plaque commemorating the "Baile de los 41" at the José Martí Cultural Center.
· Alameda Central has been considered for long as a gay cruising spot, including the times when the "Baile de los 41" happened. It is very possible that at least one of the participants was taken from there to the party, as a "prize". Besides that, the painting "Salvador Novo (El Taxi)" (1924), from Manuel Rodríguez Lozano is considered to portray writer Salvador Novo on his way to Alameda Central to procure a companion.
· The pride at Mexico City, one of the most important and oldest in Latin America, passes through inscribed parts, including Alameda Central, Francisco I. Madero street and ends in Plaza de la Constitución.
Source(s):
https://www.infobae.com/america/mexico/2018/06/23/el-baile-de-los-41-la-escandalosa-fiesta-gay-que-sorprendio-a-mexico-a-principios-del-siglo-xx/

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alameda_Central

14. Connection: Augustinian Order

Proposal: It is very probable that this connection is applicable to many more urban Latin American sites, as it is known, the Spaniards rested on religious orders to expand their dominion upon the local population and as an ideological vehicle. As with other connections that relate to monastic orders, some of the most important monastic centers were located in the vice royal capital of New Spain.

Example:
· Former Temple of San Agustín: at República de El Salvador 76. Started in 1541, and rebuilt after a 1676 convent, the Church and Convent of Saint Augustine was the seat of the order in New Spain. There was also an institutional institution, the "Colegio del Santísimo Nombre de Jesús", which formed many later University professors. As with other monastic orders, after the "Ley de Desamortización" of 1861, all religious property was confiscated and divided. After 1867, the National Library of Mexico was established in the grounds of the former convent and church.
Source(s): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiguo_Templo_de_San_Agust%C3%ADn

15. Connection: Dominican Order

Example:
The most important seat of the Dominican order in Mexico was the Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, at Belisario Rodríguez S/N, with only the present church (XVIII) and the Capilla del Señor de la Expiración remaining of the former complex, also affected by the "Ley de Desamortización", which motivated the opening of the Leandro Valle street and the 23 de Mayo square. In its heyday, was one of the richest monastic communities in the Americas, which is shown in its temple, designed by Pedro de Arrieta.

Source(s):
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iglesia_de_Santo_Domingo_(Ciudad_de_M%C3%A9xico)
https://books.google.co.cr/books?id=5ZNT_AgDB30C&pg=PA293&lpg=PA293&dq=dominicos+ciudad+mexico&source=bl&ots=uPAC0cQMj4&sig=ACfU3U0CGH67RdoFMMhsnZdJNhOGQLRAtQ&hl=es&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjctcnM0ZDoAhXuYt8KHe9mAgUQ6AEwCnoECA0QAQ#v=onepage&q=dominicos%20ciudad%20mexico

Author elsslots
Admin
#65 | Posted: 14 Mar 2020 04:47 
16. Connection: Eastern Catholic Churches
This was a little surprising, but the Maronite cathedral, Catedral de Nuestra Señora de Balvanera y Santuario de San Charbel is right in the historic center, at Correo Mayor #5. The building was also part of a Conceptionist convent, the Convento de Jesús de la Penitencia. The church is the seat of an Eparchy.

Source(s): https://www.sancharbel.org.mx/devoci%C3%B3n-a-san-charbel/parroquias-de-san-charbel/

17. Connection: Franciscans
Example: The Iglesia y Ex-Convento de San Francisco, at Francisco I. Madero #7, was the most important monastic community in the city in all of Nueva España. Founded in 1525 (just 4 yrs. after the fall of Tenochtitlan), even in the XIX century, the Franciscan complex extended for more than 32.000 m2 (roughly the area currently bordered by the Francisco I. Madero, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas, Gante and Venustiniano Carranza streets).
As other monastic communities, the "Ley de Desamortización" signified its and almost all the complex was subsequently sold and demolished. Today, only an altered Church of San Francisco (from 1710, its main entrance was blocked) and the Capilla de la Balvanera (1766) remain.

Source(s): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templo_y_exconvento_de_San_Francisco_(Ciudad_de_M%C3%A9xico)

18. Connection: Jesuits
Example: The Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso was founded in 1572 by the first Jesuits that reached present-day Mexico. After the expulsion of the Jesuits from the Spanish Dominion, in 1767, the building kept its educational role, even housing the School of Law and the School of Medicine after the Independence.

Source(s): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiguo_Colegio_de_San_Ildefonso

19. Connection: Jewish Religion and Culture
Proposal: After the centuries of repression during the Spanish Colony, and as part of the migratory movements from Europe to the American continent.

Example: The Sinagoga Histórica, also known as Templo Nidjei Israel, at Justo Sierra 71, and founded in 1941, is the third synagogue established in the city and the first founded by Ashkenazi Jews. Since its reopening in 2009, it has acted as a community center and a center for cultural and religious activities. The neighborhood of Merced -at the historic center- held a great community of Jews from the start of the XX century.

Source(s): https://mxcity.mx/2019/04/la-sinagoga-historica-de-la-cdmx-el-centro-cultural-de-la-comunidad-judia/

20. Connection: Mercedarians
Example: The former Convento de la Merced, at República de Uruguay #170, was established by the Mercedarian third order in 1595, with the present cloister (said to be a unique showcase of Mudejar architecture) being built between 1696 and 1703, with economic help from the count of Miravalle. The church -built between 1634 and 1654- was said to be the most sumptuous pf the viceroyalty of Nueva España and was demolished as a consequence of the "Ley de Desamortización" of 1861, in order to build the new city market.

Source(s): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convento_de_la_Merced_(Ciudad_de_M%C3%A9xico)

21. Connection: Nunneries
Proposal: In the capital of the viceroyalty of Nueva España, there were a number of religious communities of nuns. All these convents were affected by the liberal reforms of the 1850s and 1860s and none of them operates now as a convent.

Example:
· The fmr. Convento de San Jerónimo, at Izazaga, now Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana, was a nunnery of the order of the Hieronymites. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1648-1695), one of the most important writers of the Spanish Siglo de Oro and considered the mother of Latin American literature, lived there.
· The fmr. Convent of Regina Coeli, at Calle Regina #7, founded in 1573. It belonged to the order of the Conceptionists.
· The Church and fmr. Convent of the Inmaculada Concepción, at Belisario Domínguez #3, the oldest nunnery in the city, established in 1540. Only the church survives. The convent was the site of the ghost story of the nun Úrsula del Espíritu Santo, who hanged herself in a peach tree and the story tells that her shadow appeared in the reflection of the fountain in the middle of the cloister.
· Temple of Santa Catalina de Siena: at República de Argentina #29, was inaugurated in 1623 and belonged to the Dominican order.
· Fmr. Convento de la Encarnación: at Luis González Obregón #18. It also belonged to the Dominican order of nuns. It is the present-day seat of the Ministry of Education. The temple remains to this day.
· Church of San Lorenzo Diácono y Mártir: at Belisario Domínguez #28. It belonged to the Hieronymite nuns; the convent was founded in 1598. After the liberal reforms, the convent has housed a number of educational institutions, presently being the ESIME, Superior School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering.
Source(s): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convento_de_San_Jer%C3%B3nimo_(Ciudad_de_M%C3%A9xico)
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ex_Convento_de_Regina_Coeli
https://www.cdmx200lugares.com/templo-de-la-concepcion/#.Xmhz-3L0mUk
https://www.cdmx200lugares.com/templo-de-santa-catalina-de-siena/#.Xmh06XL0mUk
http://cdmxtravel.com/es/lugares/convento-de-la-encarnacion.html
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iglesia_de_San_Lorenzo_(Ciudad_de_M%C3%A9xico)

22. Connection: Protestantism
Proposal: Protestantism was of course forbidden during the Spanish colony, and only developed after each country's independence, Mexico City's historic centre has the oldest Anglican congregation in the region.

Example:
· Catedral de San José de Gracia, at Mesones #139, was originally the chapel of the Beatería Santa Mónica, a house for "abandoned" women and poor widows, and then of the Conceptionist Santa María de Gracia convent. The construction of the modern building was started in 1659. After the impact of the liberal laws of the 1860s, the temple was acquired by a Catholic reformist congregation, the "Iglesia de Jesús". It has been the Cathedral of the Anglican communion since 1933. The church also stands out for its library.
Source(s): http://catedralanglicanamexico.blogspot.com/2010/03/historia-del-templo-de-san-jose-de.html

23. Connection: Universities
Proposal: Naturally, Mexico City had one of the most important universities in all of America, which later became UNAM. It was born in the historical centre, and was spread throughout it. Even when the main campus left for the suburbs in the 1950s, its buildings still belong to it, house different museums and house different university-related facilities, such as museums, foundations, archives, postgraduate studies facilities, and provide university extension courses to the general public.
It is important also to point out the important role that Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz has as a cultural and feminist icon.

Example:
· The fmr. Convento de San Jerónimo, at Izazaga, now Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana, was a nunnery of the order of the Hieronymites. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1648-1695), one of the most important writers of the Spanish Siglo de Oro and considered the mother of Latin American literature, lived there.
· Palacio de la Autonomía de la UNAM: at Primo de Verdad 2. It housed the National School of Teachers, the offices of the Dean, the School of Odontology, the School of Nursery and Obstetrics, among others. It now houses the "Museum of the University Autonomy", the hall of Mexican Odontology and the University Radio. It also houses a seat of the FUNAM/ENALLT, the Universitarian Foundation, that opens courses to the general public on e.g. languages.
· Museo UNAM Hoy: at Moneda 2. Was formerly the seat of the Real y Pontificia Universidad de México. After extensive restoration (including a window that shows archaeological rests of an Aztec temple), it now houses a Museum on the University and the work it develops.
· Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso: at Justo Sierra #16. As said, originally the seat of the Jesuits in the viceroyalty. It later housed the School of Law, the School of Medicine, the National Preparatory School (1867-1989) and since 1966, houses the University Historical Archive.
· Museo de las Constituciones: at Calle del Carmen #31. Founded in 2011, in the historical building of the chapel from the Máximo Colegio de San Pedro y San Pablo.
· Palacio de la Escuela de Medicina: at República de Brasil #33. Initially the Palace of the Inquisition in the city, built 1732-1736. After the abolition of the inquisition, in 1820, it had a number of functions, until it became the seat of the School of Medicine and the Academy of Medicine, from 1854-1952. After 1980, it has been the seat of the "Museo de la Medicina Mexicana".
· Antigua Academia de San Carlos: at Academia #22. Founded in 1781 as the "Real Academia de San Carlos de las Nobles Artes de la Nueva España", the first Art Academy in the American continent, also having within its premises the first Art Museum in Latin America. It now houses the School library, with over 13.000 titles, and provides free courses to the general public. When the national university received its autonomy in 1929, the building began to house the Architecture School and the School of Plastic Arts. It still houses the Postgraduate Studies of the Faculty of Arts and Design.
· Palacio de Minería: at Tacuba #5 . Built between 1797 and 1813, as the seat of the Royal School and Royal Tribunal of Mines, it housed the National University, its School of Engineering (1867-1954) and the Institute of Physics of UNAM. Since 1962, it houses the "División de Educación Continua y a Distancia", the Historical Archive and other departments of the Engineering Faculty. It also houses the Mexican Academy of Engineering and is the venue of different conferences and the International Book Fair.
· ENALLT-SEFI (Escuela Nacional de Lenguas, Lingüística y Traducción): at República de Guatemala #90. Clearly a historical building (no more information obtained), it now is the seat of extension courses to the general public.
· Antigua Escuela de Economía: at República de Economía #92. Originally built in 1904, as the palace of the founder of the

Author elsslots
Admin
#66 | Posted: 14 Mar 2020 04:48 
24. Connection: Country named after them

Proposal: The name Mexico comes from the Nahuatl language.

It is a composed name, from Metztli=moon +xictli=belly button or center +co=place. So, according to the source provided, it means: "in the belly of the moon"/"in the center of the lake of the Moon". That comes from the fact that Texcoco lake was shaped like a rabbit, similar to the silhouettes of the Seas in the Moon, so the city of Tenochtitlan was symbolically located in the center of the Moon rabbit.

Another version of the origin of the name derives from a name given to the Aztec god Huitzilopochtli, "the hummingbird of the South", who drove the Aztecs to the valley of Anahuac: Mexictli. Mexictli is also a composed name from Metl=maguey + xictli=belly button or center +co=place; therefore meaning "in the center of the maguey", consequently referring to the foundational myth of the city.

The name of the city was adopted for the whole country after 1814, during the War of Independence, when the "Decreto constitucional para la libertad de la América Mexicana", on October 2, 1814 was proclaimed. The name was definitely adopted on September 1821, when the final Act of Independence was signed.

Example:
Source(s): https://edomex.gob.mx/significado_de_mexico
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%A9xico

25. Connection: Hotels in Historic Buildings
Proposal:
Example:
· Gran Hotel: at 16 de Setiembre #82. Inaugurated in 1899 as a department store, being the first building in the city built with a structure of metal and concrete. In 1968, in preparation of the XIX Olympic Games. It stands out architectonically for its Beaux Arts (especially Neoclassic and Art Nouveau) decoration, including the elevators and the Tiffany-styled glass vault created by Jacques Gruber in 1908.
Source(s): https://magazine.trivago.com.mx/sabes-cual-es-el-mejor-hotel-para-dar-el-grito-con-vista-al-zocalo/
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viejo_Portal_de_Mercaderes

26. Connection: Location for a Classic Movie

Proposal: Los Olvidados (1950), by Luis Buñuel, ranked as the second-best Mexican movie in history, published in 1994; and that (after public scorn in Mexico for its content and subject matter) won the Palme d'Or for best direction at Cannes. The film's negatives were added to the "Memory of the World" list by UNESCO.
Example:
· The exact filming locations are pretty unclear to me. Many scenes are shot in slums outside the city center, and in areas that there were just starting to be urbanized. However, some scenes do clearly happen in the historic center, and at the very start, the image of the Zocalo (after those of Paris, London and New York) is shown.
Source(s): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042804/

27. Connection: First Inscriptions

Proposal: Mexico (1987).

Source(s): http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/

28. Connection: Locations for playing sport

Proposal: This one is a pretty unorthodox possible addition, as the most important place for the practice of "lucha libre" (professional wrestling) in the country, one of the main such venues in the world and the place where many of its legends were forged. It also doubles as a boxing venue.

Example: Arena Coliseo: at República del Perú #77. Built from 1943 to 1953 by Salvador Lutteroth. It has a seating capacity of 5.250 people.

Source(s): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arena_Coliseo

Author meltwaterfalls
Partaker
#67 | Posted: 14 Mar 2020 05:10 
Bravo Esteban, that is a really thorough and well researched list, and even more importantly it is really useful for planning things to see on my inevitable return to this brilliant city.
I haven't made it the whole way through yet, but it looks pretty good so far at keeping to the strict limits of the core zone.

And thanks Els for posting

Author vantcj1
Partaker
#68 | Posted: 16 Mar 2020 12:11 | Edited by: vantcj1 
meltwaterfalls
Thank you all! Yes, it was a tremendous work, I used spare times on two weeks to finish it. I consider that a similar wealth of connections would appear when "combing" some other urban sites.

Most of the connections were pretty straightforward and it was very predictable that they would apply (baroque, neoclassicism, all religious orders, hotels), while others were a surprise (especially the eastern churches one, regarding the one of sports locations I wasn't aware that the main lucha libre venue was so central in the city). And many required a lot of research, for example, the one of LGBTI culture, as I wasn't aware of the exact locations where the historical events took place, in the end it is a case of a connection that does not necessarily apply.

Everyone have a great time and take care in view of COVID-19. In Costa Rica we already have 35 confirmed cases and despite increasing restrictions and closures, the number is still growing.

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