a
a
a
a
a
a

Archaeological Site of Aigai

The Archaeological Site of Aigai (modern name Vergina) became famous in 1977, when the tomb of Alexander the Great's father, King Philip of Macedon, was discovered there. This proved undoubtedly that Vergina was ancient Macedonia's first capital, Aegae.

Aegae was inhabited from the early Iron Age (1000-700 BC) onwards. It was the capital of the Macedonian state until King Archelaus transferred his seat to Pella. However, also then it remained customary for Macedonia's kings to be buried in the original capital.

Aegae flourished chiefly in the second half of the 4th century B.C. To this period belong the Palace, Theatre and the Tombs. In 168 B.C. the city was seized by the Romans and burnt down.

Map

Visit November 2003

Vergina is situated near Veroia, some 75 kilometers east of Thessaloniki. The easiest way to get there is by car. Not for the first time in my world heritage hunting-life, I had some trouble to find the site. It actually is very easy: the tumulus is like a small hill in the center of the town, with lots of souvenirshops nearby. The palace and the theatre are about 2 kilometers uphill.

The burial mound doesn't look inspiring from the outside, but when you go down inside you enter a magic scene. The place has a diameter of 110 meters, and is 12 meters high. Currently there is a fascinating combination to be seen of on site remains (tombs, columns) and museumpieces taken from the site. A lot of sublime silverware was found (enough to equip a huge kitchen), but the golden crowns made of leaves are my favourite items.

The palace is just outside town, and more like a classic Greek sight. Unfortunately the supposedly great mosaics were under cover during my visit. However, this area and the theatre below are worth strolling around.

Community Reviews


John Booth - October 2015

I travelled from Thessaloniki by bus to Veria, and changed there to a bus going to Vergina.

Having just read Scott Oden's book 'Memnon', I was most interested to see the reconstructed tomb of Macedonian King Philip II within the museum.


Olivia - August 2015

The museum in Vergina is by far my favorite. The set up is unlike anything I have ever seen before since the museum is literally underground. The dark atmosphere with spotlights of each exhibit gives the whole place an eerie, mystical feel, as if you were actually there in the time of Phillip II. I visited a lot of museums at different sites on that trip, and they are all relatively similar except for this one. I would highly recommend it to all, history aficionado or not, it is a great experience and you will learn a lot.


chris - July 2013

An amazing world heritage site and highly recommended for those wanting to see the wealth of the Ancient Macedonians and how different their burials and artefacts are compared to Ancient Greeks to the south!!


Kathy Kerrick - January 2009

We visited this site in 2007. It was the most memorable museum I have ever enjoyed. The fact that it was built on the site and in the same design of the original discovery is amazing. The quality of the restoration of the artifacts was incredible. I especially remember the crown made of delicate gold foil and decorated with what looked like 3D acorns, flowers and leaves. I also appreciated the two burial temples inside the tumulus. If you are anywhere near, be sure to visit.


Cheri Brooks - April 2008

I was a tour leader to Greece a couple of years ago. Visiting this museum in Vergina was absolutely one of the highlights of the trip for all of us. All artifacts were beautifully displayed, labeled in English, with explanations given to verify their authenticity. I was totally amazed at the craftsmanship and condition of the various items! I believe it is one of those places that most people have never heard of and I'm sure a huge percentage of the visitors to Greece miss it.


Klaus Freisinger

There are few accessible sites associated with Alexander the Great, his father Philip II, and ancient Macedonia in general, but Vergina is one of them and a very interesting one to boot. The focus of the site is the great museum that is cut into Philip´s tumulus. It´s one of the most interesting museums I´ve ever been to, and I wish I had had more time in Vergina to explore the area in closer detail. The roads in the vicinity of Vergina are scattered with tumuli, and there are probably lots of undiscovered treasures there. I also visited nearby Pella, which has some interesting mosaics and a nice museum, but doesn´t have anything like Vergina.


dk

firstly,the first capital of macedonia was not vergina but was actually vydessa (originally phrygian). The burial mound tomb architecture exhibits a perculiar style with one or two chambers having double marble doors & vaulted semi barrel light stone roof that isnt found in other parts of greece.All the big tombs are covered by huge protective soil mounds,a practice similar of neo-phrygian tombs in turkey as the king midas tomb in gordian.go to (www.geocities.com/stojangr/macedonian_orphrygian.htm) & see for yourself


Share your experiences!

Have you been to Archaeological Site of Aigai? Click here to add your own review.

Site Info

Full name: Archaeological Site of Aigai (modern name Vergina)

Site History

  • 2007 - Name change

    From "Archaeological Site of Vergina" to "Archaeological Site of Aigai (modern name Vergina)"
  •  
  • 1996 - Inscribed

    Reasons for inscription
  •  

Locations

The site has 2 locations.

  • Ancient City and Necropolis of Aegae Emathia, Central Macedonia, Greece
  • Bronze Age settlement and Cemetery of Tumuli Emathia, Central Macedonia, Greece

Connections

The site has 11 connections.

Constructions

History

Individual People

Timeline

Trivia

WHS Hotspots

World Heritage Process

  • Name changes From "Archaeological Site of Vergina" to "Archaeological Site of Aigai (modern name Vergina)" (2007)