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Vlkolinec

Vlkolinéc is a village containing a group of 50 vernacular Slovak timber-built constructions. These buildings have stone footings with log walls on top. Their walls are coated with clay, and usually painted.

The current buildings date mainly from the 19th century, but the origins of their architectural type go back several centuries earlier. Among the 50 remaining buildings are a church, a school and a shop. The rest are farmhouses. The village is still inhabited.

During the 2nd World War the village was a major site of the Slovak National Uprising. A third of the houses were burned down subsequently by the Nazis in retaliation. These weren't rebuilt.

Map

Visit May 2008

There's a tiny road that leads up to Vlkolinéc from the main highway between Ruzomberok and Banska Bystrica. Buses have to park at the foot of the hill on top of which the village is located, with a car you can go all the way up (hoping that you won't meet an opposing car). As described in the reviews below the setting amidst the green meadows is stunning.

Vlkolinéc does see quite a number of tourists nowadays. There's a modest entrance fee and a photo fee to be paid at the beginning of the main street. This street runs up a steep slope, adorned on both sides with the famous houses. The best examples are at the center of the village, which also has a wooden bell-tower and canalized stream. You can easily walk the streets in half an hour, and that includes a visit to the pitiful little 'museum'.

The site has a lovely location and the colourful buildings definitely have a certain charm. Compared to other 'Folk Villages' on the list that I've seen (Shirakawa-Go in Japan, Xidi and Hongcun in China) I feel there's something missing here though: it doesn't tell a story, it's just a group of buildings. Currently most of the houses are in use as second homes for city people. Large signs warn the tourists off the private properties. I wonder how people used to live here. What legends existed in this faraway valley, what did they eat and how did they make a living? The ICOMOS evaluation hints on a 'feudal landscape'. If this visit (and the one to another traditional village, Cicmany, on the same day) has teached me one thing, it is that I have to dive into this subject of 'vernacular architecture'.

Community Reviews


Hubert Scharnagl - January 2015

Vlkolínec is one of three world heritage sites in Central Europe that are dedicated to traditional vernacular architecture. The other two are Holasovice/Czech Republic and Hollókö/Hungary. I have visited the three villages within 12 months and must say that Vlkolínec has the most picturesque location: on a high plateau in the backdrop of the Carpathian mountains, surrounded by green meadows and forests. The village is an ensemble of about 40 colourful painted log houses, built on stone footings, the roofs covered with wooden shingles. According to the official website only a few houses are permanently inhabited, others are used as weekend cottages, it has only 19 permanent residents.

As reported by other reviewers the village can be visited in half an hour, there is not much to see: a tiny museum showing the interior of a log house, a wooden belfry (photo), a church with a cemetery. The charm of the site is the unaltered architecture and the pretty location, there are no modern houses apart from the ticket booth and the souvenir shop at the parking lot.

For centuries, the village was very remote and could only be reached on foot, today it is just a short drive on a narrow street, only a few kilometres from the main road. But it does not seem to be crowded by tourists, there were only five other cars in the parking lot when we arrived on a Saturday midday in August 2014.


john booth - December 2012

I enjoyed my visit to this isolated atmospheric village with its colourful houses.

I travelled to the village by an infrequent minibus (no. 100) from Ruzomberok station (summer only). It wound up the narrow road with its expansive views on either side, saving a walk. Afterwards I descended to Biely Potok on foot and caught a bus back to Ruzomberok from there.


Assif Am-David - October 2011

Before heading to Vlkolinec I read some reviews here and elsewhere and had the impression I was going to be disappointed by something underwhelming. Well, the village is extremely small but I found it full of atmosphere. The mountainous location is lovely as the wooden houses. There isn't much to do there for more than an hour but still I found the visit most rewarding. Compared to another famous vernacular Slovak site - Cicmany, I actually found Vlkolinec more impressive, although Cicmany too is certainly worthwhile.


Christer Sundberg - September 2006

Arriving the small industrial town of Ruzomberok quickly makes you realise that this is not the top-spot of beauty in Slovakia. Even though the town have a few highlights it’s a place better used as jump-off point for skiing or hiking in the Low Tatra Mountains, the most frequented and popular mountain area in the country.

A year-round-open ski lift near the centre of Ruzomberok takes you some 600 meters up to the forest covered mountains and a spectacular and beautiful landscape. It is perfect for a couple of hours walking and it also adds some extra spice to the hiking, knowing that the forests are filled with brown bears, wildcats and other animals, probably checking you out as you walk by.

It is here you find the small mountain village of Vlkolinec, with its small, 15th century log houses. During WWII a third of them were burnt to the ground but 45 of them still stand and is remarkably well preserved. Mind you, this it’s not a museum but a living village. So if you decide to have a coffee or a sandwich in a small café you more or less visit one of the families in their home gardens.

My visit to Vlkolinec was an absolute perfect one but that also included a full-day mountain walk. You can easily visit the village by car or taxi but to get a true experience you have to include the nature and breathe the fresh air of the Low Tatra Mountains. Its first then you realise that, above all, beauty lies in simplicity…


Ren

On a cold day in a winter,i've been there.Snow falling,the way slippy,when i got there,seeing a fantastic scenery of Vlkolinec village colored white by falling snow.That is a one of the best landscape i've ever seen.


pamela lawson

My husband and I spent a wonderful, cold but sunny day looking around this fascinating village. The history,architecture and ambience of the place has left a lasting memory. How lucky the people are to live surrounded by such beauty and serentity. Thank you for the letting us share wonderful experience.


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Site Info

Full name: Vlkolinec

Site History

Locations

The site has 1 locations.

  • Vlkolinec

Connections

The site has 9 connections.

Constructions

Geography

Timeline

World Heritage Process

  • Need for a Comparative Study study on Central European villages - ICOMOS presented to the Bureau the results of the comparative study on "Traditional Villages in the Carpathian Basin and its immediate surroundings"