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Western Tien-Shan

The Western Tien-Shan is a Central Asian mountain range known for its plant biodiversity.

Especially its wild fruit and walnut forest are among the largest remaining in the world, thus providing a genetic resource for domestic fruit species. The site consists of 13 parks and nature reserves, divided over Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.

Map

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Site Info

Full name: Western Tien-Shan

Site History

  • 2016 - Inscribed

    Reasons for inscription
  •  
  • 2016 - Advisory Body overruled

    IUCN advised Deferral, WHC went for inscription with deletion of criterion 8
  •  
  • 2015 - Incomplete - not examined

     
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Locations

The site has 13 locations. Show all

  • Aksu-Jabagly State Nature Reserve – Aulie paleontological area
  • Aksu-Jabagly State Nature Reserve – Karabastau paleontological area
  • Aksu-Jabagly State Nature Reserve – main part
  • Besh-Aral State Nature Reserve - Shandalash area
  • Besh-Aral State Nature Reserve – main part
  • Karatau State Nature Reserve
  • Padysha-Ata State Nature Reserve
  • Sairam-Ugam State National Nature Park – Boraldaitau area
  • Sairam-Ugam State National Nature Park – Irsu-Daubabin area
  • Sairam-Ugam State National Nature Park – Sairam-Ugam area
  • Sary-Chelek State Biosphere Nature Reserve
  • The Chatkal State Biosphere Nature Reserve – Bashkizilsay area
  • The Chatkal State Biosphere Nature Reserve – Maidantal area

Connections

The site has 7 connections.

Ecology

Geography

  • On National Border Elements are on the National Borders between Uzbekistan/Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan/Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan/Uzbekistan

Timeline

  • Holocene The Tienshan mountains were uplifted, folded, metamorposed etc in the Paleozoic Era (540-250mybp). But, from 25mybp, faulting and sedimentation changed the landscape. Then finally the entire area was glaciated during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. So what we see today is a largely (but of course not completely) "post glacial" Holocene landscape

Trivia

World Heritage Process