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Iguazu National Park

Iguazu National Park
Iguazu National Park, with the Falls as its main feature, was added to the World Heritage List for two reasons: its exceptional natural beauty and because itīs the habitat of rare and endangered species.

The Argentinian side of the park measures 49.200 ha. The adjacent Brazilian side is another World Heritage Site.
The waterfalls on both sides together span over 2700 m., and have a height of 80 m.

Iguazu is an indigenous (Tupi-Guarani) name, meaning Great Waters.

Year Decision Comments
1984 Inscribed Reasons for inscription



Visit October 2004

From Foz do Iguacu, I took a public bus to its Argentinian counterpart Puerto Iguazu. From there, another bus brought me to the falls.

This side also has some themepark-feeling. I did give in this time, and joined the Great Adventure. Thatīs when you cross the forest by giant car and then jump into a speedboat. The boat takes you up close to the falls, and somewhat underneath. I got terribly wet, and didnīt dry until I got back to my hotel in the afternoon and could change clothes.

Somehow the falls look smaller from the Argentinian side. However, strolling through the surrounding forest is very worthwhile here.

More photos can be found in the Picture Gallery

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Reviews

Anna Moore (UK):
We visited Iguazu Falls last year and I have to say it was one of the most impressive natural sights I have ever seen: far, far more spectacular than Niagara Falls. Most people seemed to prefer the Brazil side (great photos here: www.realworldholidays.co.uk/multi/guide/iguazufalls.aspx) but for me the Argentina side where you get right up close to the Falls was the real highlight. Have to say, unlike with most waterfalls and such like, I would happily re-visit it.
Date posted: February 2014
Jorge Sanchez (Spain):
When I was expelled from Paraguay in Stroessner times and put in the border with Brazil, it was about 6PM. I decided to walk until Niagara Falls because owing to the impressions received during my one week captivity in a horrible jail in Asuncion, without food, I could not sleep.
I walked during many hours, perhaps ten, but I was not tired. I remember that when I reached the proximities of Iguaįu Falls I started to hear the tremendous sound of the water falling. I was excited.
I arrived in time to admire the sun rising, and at about 9 AM,exhausted, I sleep for a few hours on a wood bench, until the tourists woke me up. Then I spent the rest of the day admiring such a wonder of Nature and again sleep the second night there.
The next day I hitch hiked until Matto Grosso, where soon I found a job cleaning a swimming pool in a resort for tourists.
Date posted: July 2013
Eve T. (Singapore):
Visited Iguasu Falls both Brazil and Argentina sides in Feb 2011 to compare both. I think both has their own highlights so since you're already there, you should visit both sides to get perspectives of this magnificant falls.
Argentina side takes a longer time to reach starting with a long bus ride to reach the entrance, then take the small train into the few stops and then walk almost a km to reach the Devil's Throat which is definitely the highlight. Then u trek back same distance to the train station n continue back to the Upper and Lower Falls area whr you will see countless falls and on a good day numerous rainbows.
There's an island in the middle that was supposed to be able to visit but it's closed due to high tides and strong currents (hmm, when is it never?)
Anyway personally I would prefer Argentina side due to it's varieties of falls (you name it, you see it) and the upper n lower gives you both perspectives of the falls plus the mother of all falls which is the Devil's Throat.
Word of advice: Wear your swimwear and anything waterproof. It's great to run towards a waterfall just above you! After visiting Iguazu Falls, no other waterfalls interest me anymore.
Date posted: November 2012
FUMIO SUGIURA (JAPAN):
I am a japanese and nearly 20 years ago,I lived in Sao Paulo
with my family on business for 4 years,while we often vitited Foz do Iguazu on a pleasure trip.I was so much impressed with the sizable fine view of waterfalls flowing from Argentine to Brazil.Honestly speaking,I could not find a most suitable word to express such a landscape which I had never seen before.Every time when I visited Iguazu,I enjoyed both sides ,namely Argentina and Brazilian sides.
I myself would like to visit there on the occasion of Rio de
Janeiro's OlympicGames in 2016.That's my dream!
Date posted: January 2010
John Booth (New Zealand):
As most of the falls are in Argentina, you get to see then up close, so that you are often showered with spray. There are several walking tracks, and a free train service that links the trailheads to the park entrance.

From the Cataras station there are the Upper and Lower trails that lead you along the top of the falls, and around the base to reach the (free) boat service to San Martin Island.

From the Devil's Throat station you walk out along a causeway to a big horsehoe shaped section of the falls, where the noise of the water is deafening, and clouds of spray come drifting upwards to soak you.

This has to be an experience not to be missed. But to complete it you need another half day to cross over to the Brazilian side and see the full panorama from over there.
 
Geoff Peters (USA):
I recently fulfilled a lifelong dream to see Iguazu and captured the once-in-a-lifetime visit with tons of photos, including several panoramas. Perhaps they may be of interest to you -- please see my Iguazu Photos and Pictures at Geoff's Travel Page. Iguazu ranks up there as one of the most amazing experiences of my life. Many thanks! -- Geoff Peters
 
Martin (holland):
Much better than Niagara, its atmosphere of awesome power still relates to the surroundings, providing proof of forces of nature that once made this planet what it is today.
 


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