WHS Logo

Cracow

Cracow
Cracow's Historic Centre holds Europe's largest marktesquare and numerous medieval buildings. Cracow was on Unesco's first World Heritage List, publicized in 1978. This city in the south east of Poland was founded in 1257. The formidable town square dates from the same year.

Until 1609 Cracow was the Polish capital, when it was moved to the more central Warsaw. This important role in Polish history is symbolized in the Royal Wawel Castle, a site of royal coronations and royal sepulchres.

Cracow also has one of the world's oldest university buildings and the Kazimierz district containing many Jewish memorial sites.

Year Decision Comments
1978 Inscribed Reasons for inscription



Visit February 2005

Cracow's historical centre can be easily explored on foot. It was snowing a bit when I walked around (that's why the photos look somewhat bleak). At Wawel, the Castle, I joined a tour inside the Apartments. These living quarters exhibit many Renaissance decorations and furnishings. Some Dutch china (with oriental themes), Flemish tapestries and Italian majolica chimneys. It got me thinking about the originality of many sites, and that I should stick to visiting the "originals" (Rome instead of "The Second Rome", Venice instead of "The Venice of the East", Jerusalem instead of "Polish Jerusalem").

Most impressive monument of Cracow is the 14th century Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), situated at the centre of the square. It's a huge building with a very distinctive shape: all gables wherever you look. There are little (souvenir) shops inside now. On the first floor there's a fine exhibition of large paintings by Polish artists from around 1900.

On Sunday morning I picked a walking tour from my guidebook, and went to the old Jewish neighbourhood Kazimierz. Already a considerable number of people were present at the clothes market on Plac Zydowski, although it was freezing and before 9. There are a number of synagogues in this area, all a bit more decorated on the outside than usual (perhaps to rival at least somehow the exuberant Catholic churches in Cracow). The Jewish community in Cracow has been minimalized for long, so these synagogues and the adjacent Jewish cemeteries are merely reminders from the past.

More photos can be found in the Picture Gallery

line

Reviews

John Booth (New Zealand):
Visiting Krakow was the highlight of my visit to Poland. I enjoyed the city itself, especially Kazimerz, the Jewish Quarter with its synagogues and Jewish restaurants. Then there was Wawel hill, with the cathedral and castle, and the view over the Vistula. But the best was the Rynek with its stately architecture and the fantastic food stalls.

From Krakow I also visited, Bochnia, Auchwitz, Wieliczka, Kalwaria Zebrydowska, and the wooden churches in Debno and Powroznik.
Date posted: January 2014
Jorge Sanchez (Spain):
After Auschwitz and Birkenau, my second visit in the southeast of Poland would be more at ease: the beautiful Cracow.
I arrived in the morning and would spend most of the day strolling around that city.
The first thing that surprised me was to see so many religious people in the streets, nuns and priests. Then I remembered that Poland is one of the most catholic countries in Europe and in the whole world.
When I realized that there were tramways in Cracow, immediately I guessed, rightly, that I would love the city.
The center of my walks around the Cracow would be the Main Market Square. From there I would get to know on foot the main tourist attractions.
I entered in St. Mary’s Basilica, built in gothic style during the XIV century that surprisingly had two towers, but completely different each other.
At a few meters from the Basilica, in the Main Market Square there was a monument. I read that it was devoted to Adam Mickiewicz, a romantic poet, probably the greatest in Poland, of whom I confess I did not know anything until that day.
When I was hungry I ate in the stalls, and when I was thirsty I entered a supermarket to buy juice. I felt at home in that city, not too large to get walking everywhere, from the Wawel Cathedral across the River Vistula.
Late in the afternoon I took a bus Barcelona, in my dear Spain.
Date posted: October 2013
Karl Naylor (United Kingdom):
Whilst many buildings have been restored in recent years, most obviously Ulica Grodzka, which leads towards the Wawel and is one of the oldest streets in Krakow, gimmicky new additions have blighted the centre. The new "Crystal Fountain" which is not just a fountain but a banal glass pyramid glows in different colours at night, has ruined the view outside the Mariacki Church and detracts from Krakow's old world ambience. Krakow's Rad Miejska should be held accountable for failing to preserve the city in accordance with the UNESCO criteria making it a World Heritage site. It is an international disgrace that the Rynek has been blighted like this. Shame.
It really is a cheap tawdry gimmick and lovers of Krakow should demand its prompt removal. It's already one the annual Archi-Szopa Award for being the worst piece of new architecture in Poland
Date posted: November 2010
Michal JS. (Canada):
Krakow is unique, bohemian, artistic and creative, original and historic - I think that is the best short description of my experiences in the city. Its like this hidden treasure of Europe, emerging on the global scale. The main old town square and the old jewish district of Kazimierz have probably the most unique ambience , truly a World Heritage site, where even today one can experience not just Polish, but European and World culture. One should remember to try the local food, and if possible avoid the modern shopping malls and explore more the traditional stores where you can find authentic and original products from the region.
Date posted: July 2010
Rob Gemmell (Scotland):
I spent 6 days staying in a Kazimierz appartment in Jozefa street. When we arrived in the area my initial thoughts were what on earth have we came to as the place looked a bit run down, after a few hours we soon realised that the place is bursting with atmoshere. The bars came alive and eating places were fantastic and very reasonably priced.
Kazimierz doesnt appear to have been altered much in the past 70 years. Anyone visiting Poland must take the time to go to Auswitch and Birkenau...I came out a different man than the one who entered the place.
Date posted: October 2009
Raghunandan B H (India):
Kraków is one of the amazing cities of Europe. I am one of very few people to visit Kraków from India. Polish people are very polite and friendly, with a few exceptions though.

The main market square is a tourist heaven, because of this most of the people who own shops in and around market square speak good english.

I was fascinated by seeing many historical monuments which have survived all the wars, and in quite good condition. The government is making good efforts to restore those in poor condition and maintain them.

I would like to recommend more people from India to visit Poland
Date posted: November 2008
Klaus Freisinger (Austria):
Cracow is a wonderful, well-preserved city and one of the jewels of Central Europe, definitely on a par with Prague. Although I only had a half day to explore the town, I liked the atmosphere a lot (it's also less touristy and crowded than other similar cities). The Wawel hill with the cathedral and the palace is very interesting, and the main square is one of the most beautiful squares in the world. The many remnants of the Habsburg Empire were an added bonus. Cracow is of course not a hidden gem anymore, but I do think that more people should visit it.
Date posted: September 2008
Assif Am-David (Israel):
I agree with everyone saying Cracow is a great city. I think so too. I would like to focus my review on my visit to Kazimierz - the Jewish ghetto which was very exciting for me as a Jew. Cracow's Jewish district is amazing in that it is one of the only Jewish ghettos that survived WWII essentially intact (like in Prague or Venice). The reason why the ghetto was not destroyed was the horrid Nazi idea to turn the place into an open air museum documenting the downfall of a race (der Untergang einer Rasse). Thanks to this we can still admire this quiet neibourhood which still houses a small Jewish ultraorthodox minority (how amazing!) and which otherwise became Cracow's number one night life centre. The Jewish past is not being forgotten and you can go out to some traditional restaurants where you can enjoy Kosher food and Hassidi music often played by non-Jewish bands.
There are quite a few synagogues in Kazimierz and it is unnecessary to visit them all. I would recommend to first visit the Jewish Cumminity Centre where you can get a map of the ghetto and some additional information. Sometimes they also offer cultural events connected to Cracow's Jews. The oldest synagogue in Cracow is the Isaac Synogogue (and not the Old Synagogue! which is much newer). It is a bit empty and there isn't much to see inside but it still offers a special atmosphere. Conversely, the Tempel Reform Synagogue is beautifully decorated in is very much recommended to visit as an architectural piece of art. The Old Synagogue is home to the museum of Jewish history of Cracow. Nearby Remuh Cemetery is an old Jewish cemetery reminding of Prague's. Another museum nearby - the Galicia Museum - exhibits photos and films documenting Jewish life in Poland. It is very different from the Jewish museum in the Old Synagogue and I would recommend a visit to bothe of them.
Above all, try to visit Cracow's famous Jewish Festival which takes place annually during summer in Kazimierz.
Date posted: April 2008
():
I have done a lot of traveling in the world (also part of my job), especially Europe, and I have to say Cracow is in the top two of my favourite places (my home Prato is of course the other one :)). I love Warsaw, it is very dynamic and wonderful (plus, less tourists, it seemed), but Cracow is more a center of history. I know that other Central European cities are getting popular, but I can say that while Prague and Budapest are nice, Cracow is better! As someone said to me, Cracow's castle is older, the piazza is larger and the city is cultured (and clean!) -- not like in the other cities where you have dirty streets and sleazy sex shoppes everywhere. The food is also very delicious. I also very much liked the museums (Leonardo's ``Lady with an ermine'' is here). It is a very beautiful, fairy tale city, and people (when they are not tourists -- especially the British and Germans, which are the worst!) are very nice, like in most of Poland.
I very much recommend it.

Now for practical advice. If you are a student, I recommend getting a private room in a hostel. They are very cheap, clean, comfortable and well furnished, and the staff is very helpful. You can meet people from different countries in them if you want to do that. The hotels are too expensive for students (something like 80$-200$/night), plus, who needs more than a place to sleep when you are gone for most of the day exploring this magical place. Ask the hostel staff for advice where to go.
 
Rob Wilson (UK):
There is no doubt that Krakow is lovely, but it does need some restoration. Many of the buildings are in a poor state of repair, and need more than a lick of paint.
Wawel Hill is fantastic, and is in wonderful condition.
The main square is truly charming as well.
It is rapidly catching up with Prague for tourists, so see it before it gets over-run!
Date posted: July 2005
tassos doudoulakakis (Greece):
I ve returned yesterday 10/1/2005 from POland , and i have to say that Crakow is the most beautiful city i ve ever been to so far. The atmosphere cannot be easily described by a non native english speaker but photos of the city just speak of themselves....i loved this city ...so calm , so cultivated and yet so busy and full of life...I stayed in Warsaw too which is different but Krakow is a real jewel in Europe.I hope to go again in the future
 
Ian Cade (England):
Krakow is a fantastic place, I really loved my visits here, and the centre is very well preserved and oozes history. The main square and Wawel hill complex are highlights of central Europe and contain enough history to keep anyone entertained. The Jewish quarter is very interesting as well, but I must admit the though of what went on during the Nazi occupation of the city really hit home when I was walking around it on a very very cold winters night.
The main sights are easy to get between and they are supported by a network of underground bars which are fantastic, especially in the Jewish quarter, they all seem to be in caves a massive fire risk but really interesting and cheap none the less. I would also strongly recommend CW Bruwar’s which sells beer by the metre!
Krakow is very interesting and a great base for exploring the nearby UNESCO sites; Auschwitz, Wieliczka and Kalwaria Zebrzydowska (although I did not get to the later the others are easily accessible from the central train station)
If you are in Central Europe then Krakow is a must!
 
Jeremy Tollpuddle (England):
Krakow is a truley stunning place, the main square and the Wawel are lovely and it is worth the time to wander around the Jewish quater aswell much better than Pragues. The night life here is also astounding (i honestly never thought i would say that about Poland!) try some of the many bars in caves around the main sqaure especially CW Bruwar, which sells beer by the metre!! Krakow also makes a great base for exploring the other nearby sites on the UNESCO list Auschwitz Birkenau, and the Wieleczka Salt mines both a short train ride from the main station.
 
Barbara Thomas (USA):
I visited Krakow this past Christmas (2003) and found it to be a delightful and charming city. The people there are so helpful and kind to strangers. Of course, there was a lot of activity going on especially for Christmas, but I was never at a loss for something to do or something I should see. I had a marvelous three days and would like to do it again for a longer period of time.
 
Jim Humberd (USA):
As we walked toward the city center of Kraków, Poland, we heard the famous Kraków bugle call from the tower of the Church of St. Mary. During a war with the Tartars (from western Asia) in 1297, while the Polish bugler was sounding a call, an arrow was shot through his throat, stopping the call in mid-note. In a few moments another soldier picked up the horn, and continued the call, and that is what you hear today — a bugle call, an interruption, then the bugle call continues.

At noon on Saturday the bugle call is sounded over radio stations in Poland. One year as we sailed the Atlantic from Rotterdam to Montreal on the TSS Stefan Batory, at noon on Saturday, the bugle call sounded over the ship’s PA System.
 
Jevgeni (Estonia):
Krakow is one of the most beautiful cities on the world, considered the most beautiful city in Europe. Its old traditions, wonderful and rich architecture, magic unusual atmospheare, history and friendly people makes Krakow especially nice.
Krakow is not like Prague, it is better! Krakow has a good potencial to become a most popular destination of Europe...
For many visitors Krakow bacame a favourite city. I am one of them:)
 
Mike Margeritas (Canada):
Cracow is, in short, awe inspiring. Unlike Prague, which sold it's soul and compromised it's cultured beauty with white-wash and sparkling red roof tiles, Krakow retains its atmospheric, laid back charm, yet at the same time manages to offer the visitor everything that Prague does, minus perhaps the sleazy sex shows. Krakow seems, on the whole, much more refined and artistic, ranking with the sleazy Prague and bustling Budapest as a Central European jewel.

Wawel Castle and Cathedral, Market Square, Old Town, St. Mary's Basillica, Florianska Street and Jewish Quarter give any beautiful European city a run for it's money. Don't miss this spot, you'll be impressed by it's charm and delightful beauty will have you wanting to know more and perhaps visit again.
 


Have you been to Cracow's Historic Centre? Share your experiences!

Add your own review