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World Heritage Site

for World Heritage Travellers

Frontiers of the Roman Empire

Frontiers of the Roman Empire

The Frontiers of the Roman Empire is a serial site that comprises parts of the Limes Romanus, a border defense or delimiting system of Ancient Rome.

The two sections of the Upper German-Raetian Limes in Germany cover a length of 550 km from the north-west of the country to the Danube in the south-east.

The Hadrian's Wall was built under the orders of the Roman Emperor Hadrian in AD 122. It took soldiers six years to build a wall 80 Roman miles long (117km) on the border of what is now England and Scotland. Emperor Hadrian built this wall "to separate Romans from Barbarians": it formed the most northern border of his empire. Later, there was some Roman expansion further north, resulting in the Antonine Wall.

Map of Frontiers of the Roman Empire

Legend

  • Cultural

Visit August 2004

I toured the eastern part of Hadrian's Wall by bus from Newcastle, in the appropriately named AD122. This public bus stops at all things worth seeing along the way, so you can hop off and catch a later bus after you've visited the site. A good service I think.

August 2004

My first stop was at Housesteads, the remains of a fort just at the wall. Because it was built on a hill, there are fine views over the countryside here.

August 2004

Vindolanda is a bigger complex, somewhat inland from the wall. This Roman site is actually older than Hadrian's wall itself. Archeological excavations are still under way here, and some reconstruction has been done so it is easier to imagine how it has looked like in ancient times. It's also the finding place of the historically quite spectacular Roman writing tablets, that tell about daily life in this area in Roman times.

August 2004

Community Reviews


Allan Berry Scotland 23.03.17

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by Allan Berry

Of all the WHS on the list, I’ve been to Hadrian’s Wall the most. Growing up, it was the closest, and as such, I’ve visited most of the best preserved sections: Birdoswald, Walltown, Halsteads, Vindolanda, Chesters. How best to officially ‘mark off’ such a familiar site?

We chose to walk a 10 mile section of the wall, from the Walltown Quarry section all the way to Halsteads fort, on a blustery but clear December afternoon, which really added to the atmosphere. This section represents the wall at its best preserved and most dramatic, and truly gives an impression of what the Roman soldiers posted along the wall must have felt, being on the fringes of the empire. The walk along the top of the ridge was very pleasant, though can be a little taxing in places. Halsteads is personally my favourite of the surviving fort remains, though if you’re not a member of English Heritage, it will cost you to get in. I would wholeheartedly recommend it. The AD 122 bus is very helpful for getting about, and let us get back to our parked car with little issue.

Earlier that year, we also visited the Antonine Wall in Scotland. Stretching from the Clyde to the Forth, the Antonine Wall is the northerly sibling to the more famous Hadrian’s Wall. Occupied for far less time, the Romans constructed a more temporary structure, and as such, much of it was constructed out of dirt rather than stone. Compounding the problem, the central belt of Scotland is far more populated than Cumbria and Northumberland, and thus any stonework that did exist was mostly repurposed into building material. The two best preserved sections, Bar Hill and Rough Castle, are easily visited by car from either Glasgow or Edinburgh. They were perhaps a little more difficult to appreciate as remains, but none the less they both made for a very pleasant and enjoyable day trip.


Frederik Dawson Netherlands 14.12.16

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by Frederik Dawson

In August 2006 I visited the Roman fort of Saalburg, a part of Upper German-Raetian, and at that time I wrote a review that the German section of this World Heritage Site was not well known compared to its counterpart in England because the German Roman frontiers were hard to see as it was almost entirely built by wood and right now most of them are just many small traces on the grassland or the few stones in the forest. It was really hard for normal people to appreciate this site. The only place you can get some imagination of Roman fortress is Saalburg, just north of Frankfurt, which has a fully reconstructed fort and good museum. Saalburg Fort has been mentioned in ICOMOS document as the only new reconstruction part of German-Raetian that ICOMOS accepted as a WHS, so it tells you something about the quality of this place. At that time, the best way to see Saalburg was to take a train to to Saalburg via Bad Homburg and followed the hiking route to "Romerkasteel Saalburg" for about 2 km. I remembered that I walked through lovely forest and saw some traces of the Raetian which was quite fascinating to see some ruins left in the German forest, after a good long walk in nature it was quite shocking to discover that Saalburg fort is just next to a very busy German Highway.

A decade later in December 2016, I have visited the most famous part of this UNESCO site, the Hadrian’s Wall in Northern England and the lesser known Antoine Wall in Scotland, it was a totally different experience with the German one. Hadrian’s Wall was located on the beautiful grassland hills with the long line of stone wall that seem to be endless. Something that really remarkable to see and easy to appreciate. I drove from New Castle to Carlisle and saw many well preserved sections of this great heritage site. I did many brief stop to hike along the wall and to admire the breathtaking surrounding of Northumberland and Cambrian landscapes. One of my favorite parts is the Cawfields section near the town of Haltwhistle. Not only has the Hadrian’s Wall reached one of the highest hills, the view of long line of stone wall was almost similar to the Great Wall of China, the nearby Cawfields Quarry where the Roman cut the stone to make the wall were also interesting to see. While the Hadrian’s Wall offered a remarkable experience, the Antoine Wall brought me back the memory of the German part. The Scottish section actually was quite similar to the sites in Germany. There was almost nothing to see except some earth mounds. I would rather say the German part is actually maybe better at least there were some stone foundation left, but for Scotland, there was really nothing. Fortunately I combined my trip with the Falkirk Wheel and the contemporary giant art of the Kelpies which made my trip more enjoyable.

I believe that this World Heritage Site is going to expand to include other Roman Frontier especially in Eastern Europe and the one in Netherlands. While I have no objection to add more sites as their historical values are quite obvious, the question of are there anything left to see is my main concern. I really enjoyed Hadrian’s Wall because it is something that really exist, something I can see, touch even climb on it, and actually one of the best World Heritage Site of England. But in Germany and Scotland, sometime I need to use a lot of imagination to appreciate the empty sites. I hope this great site in the future will not become the collections of obscure pits or holes or anything that archaeologists and historians can link to the Roman.


Clyde Malta 05.07.16

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by Clyde

I visited the Hadrian's wall in June 2016. I'm glad I had visited Germany's Limes first as my expectations were low and moreover I could appreciate the OUV of this transnational site. I was lucky to visit on the only day without rain for days on end, so much so that I spent a whole day here instead of a couple of hours before heading to Durham. As I drove westwards from Newcastle I made a couple of stops along the road to Carlisle. Most of the car parks are not free, however the pay and display ticket is valid for all the car parks. I visited the remains at Carrowburgh: Temple of Mithras and walked quite a stretch along the hadrian's wall path there to see the parts where the wall is still covered by grass and soil and a great grazing spot for sheep. After a long walk, I went back to the car park and drove to the Roman auxiliary fort of Vindolanda. Although this is the largest set of ruins and also the oldest (it predates Hadrian's wall!), I felt it was geared too much at attracting childrens' attention and at times it felt like a school outing hotspot. Next I drove a couple of kilometres past Housesteads Roman Fort and parked next to a visible part of Hadrian's wall with very big stones, a few metres from the main road. This helped me appreciate the seemingly neverending length of the wall across the rolling hills of Northumberland. The sight of the remains of Housesteads was a welcome change and it surely must have been an imposing fort as there are lovely views from there. I think that visiting Housesteads Roman Fort is a must to get a very good overview of several elements of this inscription. There's a very small museum next to the fort with some remains and also the UNESCO plaque in shocking pink. I also visited the Roman sites in Corbridge before heading towards Durham. All in all, I really enjoyed my visit and look forward to visit the Antonine wall in the near future.


Jay T USA 10.03.16

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by Jay T

The Antonine Wall in Scotland, constructed almost 1900 years ago, was the northernmost Roman barrier in Europe, and became the newest extension to the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site in 2008. I visited one section of the wall at Rough Castle Fort on a sunny afternoon in September 2015. Rough Castle is very close to the Falkirk Wheel, so I parked by the wheel and continued on the path above the canal to the site of the fort on the Antonine Wall. Unfortunately, because the wall was turf-covered and the wood structures are no longer extant, not much is left to see. The most striking feature is a defensive ditch with a turf-covered rampart. Beyond the rampart are foundations for former structures, such as a barracks and a bath house, and most have helpful placards to provide context. I found the section of the Antonine Wall at Rough Castle Fort to be peaceful and interesting to explore, and I look forward to some day seeing other components of this World Heritage Site in England and Germany.

Logistics: The Antonine Wall stretches across Scotland between the Firths of Forth and Clyde, and is accessible by car and foot; the sensational Falkirk Wheel made a good base for parking and hiking to Rough Castle Fort.


Michael Turtle Australia 02.02.16

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by Michael Turtle

There are lots of ways to see this WHS - in two countries. I have been to the UK's Hadrian's Wall site, but for the German bit, I focused on Saalburg Roman Fortress near Bad Homburg. It is the only Roman fortress in the world to be rebuilt and is imposing on a hill with large external walls guarding the buildings inside.

If a reconstructed Roman fort is not your thing but you’re in the area near Saalburg, another option is to go exploring yourself. In the forests nearby are relatively untouched Roman ruins and visitors are free to hike along the trails and discover things for themselves.

In fact, it’s the same along much of the original boundary wall that stretches across the Germany. Although there are official sites that have been protected or restored, there’s still a lot which is just out in the open. Because the original route of The Limes covers so much of the country, it’s easy to come across a part of it on your travels and see what there is to visit in the area.

Read more from Michael Turtle here.


Tom Livesey United Kingdom 22.10.15

I visited Hadrian's Wall in October 2015 whilst in the area for a family reunion. We walked a circular route of about 10km, starting in the Northumbrian hamlet of 'Once Brewed', walking along the wall and taking in two of the ruined Roman forts - Housesteads and Vindolanda (although without paying to enter them).

There is quite a view of the lakes below from the ridgeline between Once Brewed and Housesteads, so I can recommend it as a section worth visiting. Having said that, there was little to see but fog when we went.

Hopefully somebody can visit and review the Antonine Wall for us, since nobody seems to have covered this recent addition yet.

Read more from Tom Livesey here.


Clyde Malta 09.10.13

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by Clyde

I visited the German Limes and Roman Fort of Saalburg in Bad Homburg in October 2013. The Limes are the only original stone remains still in place today in Germany. The rest was mainly made of wood and therefore only reconstructions can be seen. Having said this, the Roman Fort in Saalburg really gives you a concrete idea of the importance attached to control the borders of the Roman Empire. There are several informative posters in German and English as well as several artefacts excavated from this site. The price is reasonable and parking is free. Hopefully I'll have the opportunity to visit Hadrian's Wall in the near future but I'm glad I visited the German sites first.


Ingemar Eriksson Sweden 23.06.12

I visited the Roman Museum in Aalen which is east of Stuttgart along B29 road. It is a museum built at the site of a roman cavalry fort along the Limes. Actual ruins of the fort outside. Several other places along the Limes i identified and preserved or rebuilt. There is also a Trail along at least parts of the Limes in Germany, look for "Limeswanderweg" in your search programme.

As Limes mainly was built of wood, it is not likely much could survive up to now. They have rebuilt tower for guardians some 10 km east of Aalen and in the same areas are some other sites to look at.


Ian Cade England 15.06.11

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by Ian Cade

I had previously resisted the temptation to tick off this site by visiting the remnants of Hadrian’s Wall in suburban Tyneside, so to do the site some justice I decided to walk a craggy 20km stretch of the wall between Once Brewed and Chollerford on an overcast Saturday in June.

This was an exceptionally rewarding walk taking in the wall at its scenic best. The first section from Once Brewed until Housesteads was particularly impressive, especially the dip down to Sycamore Gap. It was a fairly strenuous trek, but the wall was continuously visible on this stretch and viewing it meandering up and down the hills was really rewarding. It was surprising just how much archaeology there is at this site. We had a look at ruins at Houseteads and Chesters, both of which were large sets of ruins and would be worthy of inscription by themselves, however there were turrets, milecastles and remains of temples popping up consistently along the 20km we walked. It must be a real delight for archaeologist to know just how much information they can gain from these sites.

Like many others here we used the AD 122 bus which was a very useful way of getting to the start of our walk, and I imagine would be exceptionally useful if wanting explore the sites along the wall without your own transport. I runs from Newcastle which I think is one of England’s most interesting cities so gives you a chance to mix and urban stay with a bit of rural sight-seeing.

I am pretty sure I will return to Hadrian’s wall at some stage in the future, and I would also be keen to visit the sites in Scotland and Germany to see the other incarnations of the roman frontier. The walk along the middle section of the wall was a really great way to get some exercise and also visit one of Britain’s best historic sights.

[Site 7: Experience 8]


John booth New Zealand 16.10.10

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by John Booth

Having now visited the boundaries of the Roman Empire in Britain and Germany I must say that the British wall is much more visible, and accessible thanks to the AD122 bus. Saalburg is indeed an interesting reconstructed fort in a pleasant forest location on a hilltop. I reached it by bus from Bad Homburg. From the fort I walked downhill through the forest passing several marked watchtower foundations along the way, to reach Saalburg station.

Near Neuwied on the Rhine I found some excavations of Roman Baths in Niederbieber, and a reconstructed watchtower on a hilltop in Oberbieber. Both were reached by bus # 101 from Neuwied.

In Miltenberg on the Main river there is an interesting museum displaying a number of Roman artifacts found along the Limes in that area.

In Aschaffenburg I visited the Pompejanum, a reconstructed Roman villa.

Near Konigstein in the Taunus I visited Kleine Feldberg, an excavated fort and bathhouse up a track from the Rote Kreutz bus stop at Glasshutten.

There are many other locations worth investigating listed on the Limesstrasse website, but they recommend travelling by bicycle if you want to travel the whole distance.


Jay Wills, United Kingdom 15.09.08

As a proud Northumbrian I have a keen interest in what happens to Hadrian's Wall. This summer I have been looking at it in depth for part of my University work. Visiting Vindolanda for the first time in about ten years, as well as Housesteads for the first time ever, has been very enjoyable - despite the dismal weather during my visit to the former. For anyone who does not have the benefit of a car to get around, using the AD122 bus is a must.

Also, this summer I took a trip to Germany to visit Saalburg for myself. It is genuinely a fascinating place. In terms of value for money it was excellent. The bus fare from Bad Homburg station, as well as the entry fee, were both very reasonable. For any aficianados of Roman history, visiting Hadrian's Wall and Saalburg are a must!


David Berlanda Italy / Czech Republic

Frontiers of the Roman Empire by David Berlanda

In our trip to Germany we have visited the Roman fort of Saalburg, part of the 220 kilometres Limes barrier Raeatian section, one of the walls that have been marking the boundaries of the Roman empire for some centuries. The original fort (90 AD) covered an area of about 0,70 hectares and had a rectangular plan with corner towers. In 135 AD was built a larger fort, of 3,2 hectares (221 by 147 metres), over the earlier one, with four gates, a stone and timber defence wall with rampart walk and a double ditch. The remains of many internal buildings have been excavated and entirely reconstructed in stone and timber under the emperor William II. There are the granary, the commander’s quarters, the barrack blocks for the common soldiers and the headquarters buildings with the monumental assembly room the colonnaded courtyard, the rooms, the offices and the armouries. Interesting are the reconstructions of a barrack room, home to a squad of eight soldiers who lived in close quarters, of the richly decorated officer’s dining room, of the regimental shrine, the spiritual and religious centre of the fort, of the ovens and of the “restaurant”. Between the remains of the civilian settlement just outside the fort there is a bath house, a guest house, the cellars and the wells of the private houses and the reconstructions of the Jupiter column and of the Temple of Mithras. Near the fort there is a reconstruction of the limes at an ancient border crossing and a long elevation of the soil where it passed.

I quite liked the fort because it’s an impressive example of a Roman border fort, even if we have visited the remains outside the fort quite in a hurry, because they are in a wood and it was raining. The fort is worth of visit if you are in Hesse and I think that the Limes absolutely justifies the inscription, but in my opinion with the Limes in Germany and the Hadrian’s Wall in UK can be inscribed the whole boundaries of the Roman Empire in many countries. The state of conservation of the building is sometimes very good (the reconstructions), and sometimes they are ruined, but I think that the reconstruction of the fort, even if it has a historical value because it is of the 19th century, was a completely wrong decision that compromises completely its authenticity and the only authentic buildings are those ruined outside the fort. It is easy to reach Saalburg: you have to exit from the highway A5 going from Darmstadt to Bad Hersfeld at Bad Homburg and then take the road B456; you have to pay to visit the fort, but not the remains around it (if you want to see them well, walk on the Saalburg Circuit Road, 2,4 kilometres long, that brings you to the Limes and to the other remains).

Photo: Saalburg - Fort walls


Klaus Freisinger Austria

After a long period of aggressive expansion, the time had to come for one Roman emperor to put a stop to it and say out loud that Rome was not actually destined to rule the entire world and that the Empire had to have stable borders. This man was Hadrian, and to secure the borders of the Province of Britannia, he had this magnificent wall built between the coasts of the North and Irish Seas to separate, as the famous statement goes, "the Romans from the Barbarians". (Later, though, the borders were pushed even further north, when the Romans built the Antonine Wall in today's Glasgow-Edinburgh area and the south of Scotland was also part of the Empire). Breathtaking views make a hike along the wall a wonderful experience (and you can see the oaktree featured in "Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves"...) that nourishes your body as well as your mind. Roman history and their way of thinking rarely can be appreciated so closely. It is surprisingly easy to visit the Wall, at least coming (as I did) from Newcastle, where the AD122 bus waits for you. The sites of Vindolanda, Housesteads, and Chesters are especially interesting and give a great overview of the area's history and archaeology, especially about the Romans' daily life. Many letters from the soldiers posted here have survived, and some are quite funny, such as the auxiliary troops from Spain and Syria complaining about the miserable weather. I went there on a glorious (but probably rare) summer day, but I think the area is interesting even in winter. One of the best sights I have seen in all Britain.

On a separate trip to Germany, I visited the Saalburg, a reconstructed border castle near Bad Homburg. It was actually built around 1900 on the orders of Kaiser Wilhelm, and provides interesting insights into Roman life on the frontier. Some original features are still preserved, both inside and outside the castle, as well as some actual remains of the Limes itself, about a 10-minute walk away from the castle through the forest (complete with "You are now leaving the Roman Empire" signs).

On yet another trip, I went to see the Antonine Wall. From Falkirk station (on the line between Glasgow and Edinburgh), I took a taxi to the site of Rough Castle and took a walk around - there is really not much left to see, basically only trenches and other changes in the landscape, no built structures. There are some helpful signs, but you need a bit of imagination here.


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Site Info

Full name: Frontiers of the Roman Empire

Unesco ID: 430

Inscribed: 1987

Type: Cultural

Criteria: 2   3   4  

Link: By Name By ID

Site History

  • 2008 - Extended To include the Antonine Wall
  • 2005 - Extended To include two sections of the Limes in Germany
  • 1987 - Inscribed 

Locations

The site has 439 locations. Show all

  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Auchendavy Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Balmuildy Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Bank Mill tower 15a, 250m north west of Belmont House, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Bar Hill Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Bean Burn 1 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Bean Burn 2 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Bearsden Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Beaumont motte castle and section of Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 70 including turret 70a
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Beckfoot Roman fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Bewcastle Roman fort, high cross shaft in St Cuthbert's churchyard, and Bew Castle medieval shell keep castle
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Biglands House (milefortlet 1) and associated parallel ditches, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Birdoswald Roman fort and the section of Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the River Irthing and the field boundaries east of milecastle 50
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Blitterlees (milefortlet 12), part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Boomby Lane 1 and 2 Roman temporary camps
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Boothby Roman fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Brampton Old Church Roman fort and the medieval Church of St Martin
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Brown Dikes Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Brown Moor Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Brownrigg milefortlet 22, 800m north east of the Cemetery Chapel, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Brownrigg North tower 21b, 830m north west of Canonby Hall, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Building remains north of G
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Building remains of south of Pfahlheim
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Building remains south of G
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Building remains south of the watchtower WP 9/67
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Building remains southwest of Saalburg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Burgh by Sands Roman fort, Beaumont camp, Burgh Castle & Hadrian's Wall from boundary west of churchyard, Beaumont to Burgh Head in wall miles 70 and
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Burnhead Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Burrow Walls Roman fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Cadder Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Campfield (tower 2b) & associated parallel ditches & Roman road, 350m south west of Campfield Farm part of Roman frontier defences along Cumbrian coas
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Cardurnock (tower 4b) and earlier ditch system and patrol road, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Cardurnock Marsh turret 4a
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Cardurnock milefortlet (Mf 5)
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Carrawburgh Roman fort & Hadrian's Wall & vallum between the field boundary east of the fort & the field boundary west of Coventina's Well in wall mil
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Carriden Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Carvoran Roman fort and Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the unclassified road to Old Shield & the field boundary west of the fort in wall miles 45 &
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Castlecary Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Castlehill Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Castlesteads Roman fort and the vallum between the track to the east of Castlesteads fort and the Cam Beck in the west
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Cawfields Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Chapel Rigg Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Chesters Pike Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Civil settlement of Butzbach
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Civil settlement of Niedernberg northern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Civil settlement of Saalburg east of B 456 including watchtowers WP 3/67 to 3/69
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Cleddans Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Coesike East Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Coesike West Roman temporary camps 1 and 2
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Corbridge (Corstopitum) Roman station
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Crooks Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Croy Hill Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Croy Hill Fortlet
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Defended settlement and Roman signal station 410m south of West Crindledikes
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Drumburgh Roman fort and Hadrian's Wall between Burgh Marsh and Westfield House in wall miles 76 and 77
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Dubmill Point milefortlet 17, 560m WNW of Hill House, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Duntocher Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Eight Roman inscriptions in the Roman quarry in Combcrag Wood, 350m south of Hadrian's Wall
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Falkirk Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fell End Roman temporary camp and section of the Stanegate Roman road
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort Altheimer Strasse
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort Schrenzer
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil setllement of Weissenburg eastern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Aalen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Arnsburg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Arzbach
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Bad Ems northern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Boehming
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Butzbach eastern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Butzbach western part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Ellingen north of Road 2389
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Ellingen south of Road 2389
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Friedberg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Gnotzheim
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Grosskrotzenburg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Heddesdorf
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Jagsthausen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Jagsthausen central and eastern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Jagsthausen eastern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Jagsthausen northern and eastern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Jagsthausen south-western part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Jagsthausen western part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of K
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Langenhain
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Lorsch
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Mainhardt
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Marienfels
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Mark
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Miltenberg-Altstadt north-eastern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Miltenberg-Altstadt southern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Miltenberg-Altstadt western part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Niederberg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Niederbieber
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Niedernberg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Obernburg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Osterburken
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Pf
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of R
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of R
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of R
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Reinau-Buch
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Ruffenhofen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Saalburg west of B 456 including watchtowers WP 3/56, 3/66, fortlets Heidenstock and Altes Jagdhaus
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Schirenhof
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Seligenstadt
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: fort site and civil settlement of Theilenhofen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Trennfurt
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Unterb
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Unterschwaningen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Walld
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Weissenburg eastern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Welheim-West
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Welzheim-Ost
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site and civil settlement of Wörth
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site of Burgsalach
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site of Hungen-Inheiden
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fort site of Oberhochstatt
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Adolfseck
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Dicker Wald 1
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Eichkopf
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Ferbach
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Holderbusch
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Lehnenwiesen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Lochm
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Mainhardt-Herrenwiesen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet of Freim
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet of Pfarrhofen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Rheinbohl
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlet Wingertsberg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortlets and site of the fort and civil settlement of Kemel
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortsite and civil settlement of Echzell
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortsite and civil settlement of Ober-Florstadt
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Fortsite of Holzhausen and civil settlement western part including watchtowers WP 2/31a to 2/34
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Glasgow Bridge
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Great Chesters Roman fort and Hadrian's Wall between the Caw Burn and the track to Cockmount Hill farm in wall miles 42 and 43
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Grindon School Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall & vallum between field boundary east of milecastle 24 & field boundary west of the site of turret 25b in wall miles 24-25
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall & vallum from A6071 to The Cottage in the case of the Wall, & to the road to Oldwall, for the vallum, in wall miles 57, 58 & 59
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and associated features between the boundary east of turret 34a and the field boundary west of milecastle 36 in wall miles 34, 35 and 3
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and associated features between the field boundary west of turret 37a and the road to Steel Rigg car park in wall miles 37, 38 and 39
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum and their associated features between Poltross Burn and the River Irthing in wall mile 48
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between Banks Green Cottage and the road to Lanercost at Banks and the road to Garthside in wall miles 52, 53 and 54
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between Baron's Dike and Birky Lane at Walby, in wall miles 60, 61 and 62.
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between Birky Lane at Walby and the east side of the M6 in wall miles 62 and 63
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between Chesters and the road to Simonburn in wall miles 27, 28 and 29
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between St Oswald's Cottages, east of Brunton Gate and the North Tyne in wall miles 25, 26 and 27
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between Sunnybrae at Halton Shields and Haltonchesters Roman fort in wall miles 20 and 21
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the access road to Glendale caravan park and the track south of Kirkland House in wall miles 77 and 78
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the B6309 and the B6321 in wall miles 16, 17 and 18
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the B6321 and Sunnybrae at Halton Shields, in wall miles 18 and 19
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the Fence Burn and the track to Portgate Cottage in wall miles 21 and 22
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the field boundaries east of milecastle 50 and the boundary west of Coombe Crag in wall miles 50 and 51
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the field boundary at Brown Dikes and the field boundary east of turret 34a in wall miles 32, 33 and 34
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the field boundary west of Carvoran Roman fort and the west side of the B6318 road in wall mile 46
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the field boundary west of Coombe Crag and Banks Green Cottage and the road to Lanercost at Banks in wall miles 51 &
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the field boundary west of Coventina's Well and the field boundary at Brown Dikes in wall miles 31 and 32
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the field boundary west of Wall Knowe and Scotland Road including the Roman fort at Stanwix in wall mile 65
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the March Burn and Oatens Bank, Harlow Hill in wall miles 13,14 and 15
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the road to Caw Gap and the Caw Burn in wall miles 41 and 42
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the road to Simonburn and the field boundary east of Carrawburgh car park in wall miles 29, 30 and 31
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum between the track to Portgate Cottage and the field boundary east of milecastle 24 in wall miles 22 and 23
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum from East Town House, Heddon-on-the-Wall to the A69 trunk road in wall mile 12
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum in wall mile 10 from Dene House to Throckley Bank Top
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum in wall mile 66, Stanwix Bank to Stainton
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum in wall mile 7, Denton section of Hadrian's Wall, Denton Turret and Hadrian's Wall at West Denton
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum in wall mile 7, Scotswood section from Denton Road to Denton Dene
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum in wall mile 7, Scotswood section of vallum 75m long at Denton Dene
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum in wall mile 8 from Denton to Blucher
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall and vallum in wall mile 9, Blucher to Dene House
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between Apple Garth, Westfield, and the dismantled railway in wall mile 77
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between Eden Vale house and the Cam Beck in wall mile 56
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between Fulwood House at Burgh by Sands and Burgh Marsh in wall miles 72 and 73
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between Grinsdale and the field boundary south of the site of St Andrew's Church, Kirkandrews on Eden in wall miles 68 and 69
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between Houghton Road and Tarraby in wall mile 64
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between Port Carlisle and Bowness-on-Solway in wall miles 78 & 79
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between Tarraby and Beech Grove, Knowefield in wall miles 64 and 65
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between the Cam Beck and Newtown Farm in wall miles 56 and 57
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between the dismantled railway and the access road to Glendale caravan park in wall mile 77
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between the east end of Davidson's Banks & road to Grinsdale & vallum between Davidson's Banks & dismantled railway in wall miles 67 &
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between the field boundary to the south of the site of St Andrew's Church and Eden Bank at Beaumont in wall miles 69 and 70
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between the M6 motorway and the property boundaries to the east of Houghton Road in wall mile 64
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between the road to Garthside and The Centurion Inn, Walton, in wall miles 54 and 55
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between the road to Laversdale at Oldwall and Baron's Dike in wall miles 59 and 60
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between the track to Cockmount Hill and Walltown Quarry East in wall miles 43, 44 and 45
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall between Walltown Quarry East and Walltown Quarry West in wall mile 45
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall from Oatens Bank, Harlow Hill, to Whittle Dene Watercourse in wall mile 16
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 0, section between Eastfield Avenue and Tumulus Avenue
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 0, two sections of Hadrian's Wall between Sharpe Road and The Avenue
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 0, Wallsend Roman fort, Segedunum
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 1, three sections between Stotts Road and Vauxhall Road
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 2, Byker section of Hadrian's Wall and presumed site of milecastle 3 at Shields Road West
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 2, Walker section of Hadrian's Wall 171m long across Millers Dene playing field
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 2, Walker section of Hadrian's Wall near the junction of Fossway and Shields Road
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 2, Walker section of Hadrian's Wall under the forecourt of the Fosse public house
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 4, sections of wall between Crawhall Road and Jubilee Road
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 5, sections of wall in playing field of Rutherford School
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 6, Condercum Roman fort, Benwell
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 7, Benwell length of vallum of Hadrian's Wall in the grounds of Benwell Hill Cricket Club
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 7, Scotswood section of Hadrian's Wall in garden of West Road Methodist Chapel
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 7, Scotswood section of Hadrian's Wall in the grounds of Benwell Hill Cricket Club
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall north of Kirkland House, Port Carlisle in wall mile 78
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between Drawdykes Castle and Whiteclosegate in wall mile 64
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between east side of road at Burgh Head, & boundary south of Ash Tree Square, Burgh-by-Sands in wall miles 71 & 72
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between Mill Beck and the field boundary east of Kirkandrews Farm in wall mile 69
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between Mill Beck and the field boundary east of Kirkandrews Farm in wall mile 69
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between the boundaries north of the properties on Whiteclosegate and the field boundary west of Wall Knowe in wall miles 64 and
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between the dismantled railway north of Knockupworth Cottage and the dismantled railway south of Boomby Gill in wall mile 67
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between the dismantled railway south of Boomby Gill and the field boundary south east of Mill Beck in wall mile 68
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between the dismantled railway west of Kirkandrews Farm & the dismantled railway south east of Burgh by Sands in wall miles 70 &
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between the M6 motorway and Drawdykes Castle in wall mile 64
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between the track south of Kirkland House and Bowness-on-Solway in wall miles 78 & 79
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between the watercourse 400m south east of Glasson and the access road to Glendale caravan park in wall miles 76 and 77
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum between West End, Burgh By Sands and the track to Dykesfield in wall miles 72 and 73
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall vallum in wall mile 6, Benwell length of vallum of Hadrian's Wall in grounds of St Cuthbert's School
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall, associated features & a Romano-British settlement between the road to Steel Rigg car park & the road through Caw Gap in wall miles 39
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Hadrian's Wall, vallum, section of the Stanegate Roman road and a Roman temporary camp between the B6318 road and Poltross Burn in wall miles 46 and 4
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Haltonchesters Roman fort, settlement & Hadrian's Wall & vallum between the field boundary east of Haltonchesters fort & the Fence Burn in wall mile 2
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Haltwhistle Burn 1 Roman temporary camp, fortlet and section of the Stanegate
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Haltwhistle Burn 4 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Haltwhistle Burn Roman temporary camps 2 and 3 and area of cord rig cultivation
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Herd Hill (milefortlet 4) and associated parallel banks and ditches, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Herd Hill North (tower 3b), 175m north east of the sheep wash, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Housesteads fort, section of Wall & vallum between the field boundary west of milecastle 36 & the field boundary west of turret 37a in wall miles 36 &
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Inveravon Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Kinneil Fortlet
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Kirkbride Roman fort, part of associated vicus and length of Roman road around, 370m south east of Whitrigg Bridge
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Kirkintilloch Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Knockcross Roman temporary camp at Grey Havens
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Lees Hall Roman camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtower WP 1/87 and 1/88
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 1/2 and 1/3
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 1/39 and 1/40
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 1/60 and 1/61
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 1/67 and 1/69
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 1/88 and 1/89
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 1/93 and 2/13 including fort site and civil settlement of Bad Ems southern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 13/40 and 13/41
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 13/40 and 13/41
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between Watchtowers WP 13/5 and 13/6
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 2/13 and 2/14
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP 9/68 and 9/70
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowers WP/ 1/34 and 1/35
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between watchtowzers WP 1/30 and 1/31
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between WP 4/36 and 4/37
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between WP 4/37 and 4/39
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection between WP 4/81 and 4/82
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limessection north of Arzbach
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Limestone Corner Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Low Mire (milefortlet 20) 50m north of Heather Bank, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Low Mire (milefortlet 20) 50m north of Heather Bank, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Maiden Way Roman road from B6318 to 450m SW of High House, Gillalees Beacon signal station and Beacon Pasture early post-medieval dispersed settlement
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Markham Cottage Roman temporary camps 1 and 2, a section of the Stanegate Roman road, a length of Roman road and two Roman cemeteries
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Maryport (Alavna) Roman fort, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast, its associated vicus and a length of Roman road
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Maryport Golf Course tower 22a, 350m north of the Cemetery Chapel, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Mawbray Sandpit tower 16b, 680m WSW of Hailforth, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Milestone House Roman temporary camp and section of the Stanegate Roman road
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Moss Side 1 and 2 Roman temporary camps
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Mumrills Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Murrhardt civil settlement northern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Murrhardt civil settlement northern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Nether Denton Roman fort, associated vicus and length of Stanegate Roman road
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Nowtler Hill 1 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Nowtler Hill 2 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Old Kilpatrick
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Palisade ditches, part of Roman frontier defences along Cumbrian coast, Roman camp & road & part of Romano-British field system,250m north of Silloth
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Parton Roman fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Pasture House (milefortlet 3), part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Pasture House turret 3a
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Ravenglass Roman fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Ravenglass Roman fort bath-house, also known as Walls Castle
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Red House Roman camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Rise How tower 25a, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast including remains of prehistoric burial mound and early medieval kil
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Roman aqueduct to Great Chesters from the Cawburn
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Roman camp, 290m north west of Seldom Seen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Roman fort and watch tower, 800m SSW of Amberfield
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Roman fort, Anglo-Saxon cemetery, motte and bailey castle and tower keep castle
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Roman fort, South Shields
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Roman fortlet 40m SSW of Castle Fields
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Roman quarry inscription on Queen's Crags, 680m south east of East Hotbank
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Roman signal station on Mains Rigg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Rough Castle Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Rudchester Roman fort, associated civil settlement and a section of Hadrian's Wall and vallum from the A69 to the March Burn in wall mile 13
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Sea Brows (milefortlet 23), 500m south west of Bank End part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Seabegs Wood Fortlet
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Seatsides 1 Roman temporary camp and section of the Stanegate Roman road from the west side of the road from Once Brewed to the south side of the B631
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Seatsides 2 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Signaltower Johannisberg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Signaltower W
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Silloth Golf Course tower 12a, 670m WNW of Blitterlees Farm, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Silloth Golf Course tower 12b, 410m north west of Heatherbank, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Skinburness (milefortlet 9), part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast, and earlier Roman camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Stone circle, defended settlement, Romano-British farmstead & field system, Roman camp & group of shielings immediately south of Greenlee Lough
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Summerston Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Sunny Rigg 1 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Sunny Rigg 2 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Sunny Rigg 3 Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Swarthy Hill North tower 20b, 460m south west of Blue Dial, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The Roman bath house to the north east of Castlesteads Roman fort in wall mile 56
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The Roman fort and associated civil settlement and a medieval tower house at Bowness on Solway at the west end of Hadrian's Wall in wall mile 80
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The Roman fort, vicus, bridge abutments and associated remains of Hadrian's Wall at Chesters in wall mile 27
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The section of Stanegate Roman road from Fell End Roman temporary camp to the track to Old Shield, and the Roman cemetery adjacent to Carvoran Roman f
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The Stangate at Crosby Lodge
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The vallum and a British settlement between the field boundary west of turret 37a & the road to Steel Rigg car park, in wall miles 37, 38 & 39
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The vallum and early Roman road between the field boundary east of turret 34a and the field boundary west of milecastle 36 in wall miles 34, 35 and 36
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The vallum between Cockmount Hill and Walltown Quarry West in wall miles 43, 44 and 45
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The vallum between Oatens Bank, Harlow Hill, and Whittle Dene Watercourse in wall mile 16
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The vallum between the field boundary south east of Heads Wood and the A6071 road in wall mile 57
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The vallum between the road to Garthside and the track east of Castlesteads in wall miles 54, 55 and 56
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The vallum between the road to Laversdale at Oldwall and Baron's Dike in wall miles 59 and 60
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The vallum between the road to Steel Rigg car park and the road in Caw Gap in wall miles 39, 40 and 41
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Throp Roman fortlet
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Twice Brewed Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Vindolanda (Chesterholm) Roman forts, civil settlement and cemeteries, adjacent length of the Stanegate Roman road and two milestones
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Walwick Fell Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchclose Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtoers WP 2/26 to 2/30
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower SP 3/5*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/31
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/39
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/51
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/52
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/60
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/61
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/62
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/64
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/65
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/73
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/77
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/84
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/87
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/88
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 1/93
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 13/40
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 13/50
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 13/54
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 14/28
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 2/1 including fortlet Bad Ems Auf der Schanz
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 2/31
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 3/1 to 3/14 including the civil settlement of Zugmantel western part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 3/19* to 3/21*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 3/23*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 3/38*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 3/4*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 3/42*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 3/49*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 4/17*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 4/37*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 4/39*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 4/81
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtower WP 7/37
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/1 to 1/2
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/11 to 1/20 including the fortlet Am Forsthausweg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/21 to 1/22
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/23 to 1/24
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/24 to 1/26
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/27 to 1/29
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/3 to 1/10
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/30
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/32 to 1/34
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/35 and 1/35a
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/36*
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/37 to 1/38
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/41 to 1/50 including the fortlet Anhausen
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/53 to 1/57
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/58 to 1/59
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/67 to 1/66
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/69 to 1/72 including the fortlet Hillscheid
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/74 to 1/76
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/78 to 1/81
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/83 to 1/86
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 1/89 to 1/92
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 12/39
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 12/40 to 12/59
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 12/60 to 12/68
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 12/69 to 12/85
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 12/86 to 13/5 including fort site and civil settlement of Halheim
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 13/13 to 13/15
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 13/16 to 13/36 including fort site and civil setllement of Dambach
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 13/37 to 13/40
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 13/40
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 13/41 to 13/45
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 13/46 to 13/49
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 13/51 to 13/53
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 13/6 to 13/12
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 14/1 to 14/27 including the fortlets of G
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 14/29 to 14/62 including fortlets Kaldorf and Raitenbuch
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 14/63 to 14/78 including fortlets Hegelohe and Biebig
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 15/1 to 15/7
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 15/11 to 15/26 and fortlets Hinterer Seegraben and G
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 15/8 to 15/10
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 2/14 to 2/16
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 2/17 to 2/19 including fort and civil settlement of Hunzel
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 2/2 to 2/4
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 2/20 to 2/22
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 2/35 to 2/48 including the fortlet D
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 2/5 to 2/6
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 2/50 to 2/55 including Justinius Rock
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 2/7 and 2/13 including fortlet Becheln
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 3/15 to 3/19 including the fort site of Zugmantel and civil settlement eastern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 3/20 to 3/22
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 3/23
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 3/24 to 3/40Watchtowers WP 3/24 to 3/40 including the fortlet Maisel, fort and civil settlement Alteburg-Heftrich, fortlet Eichelgarten
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 3/41 to 3/44
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 3/45 to 3/52 including the fort site and civil settlement of Feldberg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/1 to 4/19a including fortlets Kaisergrube, Ockstadter Wald, Kapersburg, Rittergraber
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/20 to 4/36 including the fortlets Hunnenkirchhof 1 and Hunnenkirchhof 2
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/40 to 4/44 including the fortlet Dicker Wald 2
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/45 to 4/52 including the fortlets Hainhaus and Holzheimer Unterwald
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/53 to 4/57
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/59 to 4/71 including the fortlets Feldheimer Wald and Langsdorf
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/72 to 4/73
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/76 to 4/80 including the fortlets Unterwiddersheim and Masohi
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 4/82 to 5/8 including fortlets Langendiebach, Buchkopf, Stammheim, Staden, Lochberg, Haselheck, Altenstadt
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 5/11 to 5/12
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 5/13 to 5/14 including the fortlet Neuwirtshaus
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 5/15 to 5/16
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 5/9 to 5/10
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 7/1 to 7/36 including fortlets Haselburg,Buergstadt and fort site and civil settlement of Miltenberg-Ost
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 7/38 to 8/10 including fortlet Rehberg
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 8/11 to 8/28 including fortlet Hintere Kalbe
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 8/29 to 8/30
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 8/31 to 8/41
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 8/44 to 9/2
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 9/100
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 9/101 to 9/131 including the fortlets of R
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 9/132 to 12/38 including fortlet Klein-Deinbach
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 9/14 to 9/32 including the fort site of Westernbach
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 9/2* to 9/13
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 9/33 to 9/35
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 9/36 to 9/68
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP 9/70 to 9/99a including the fortlet Hankertsm
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watchtowers WP WP 2/23 to 2/26 including fortlet Pohl
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Watling Lodge Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Welzheim-Ost civil settlement northern part
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Westerwood Fort
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Wilderness Plantation
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Willowford Roman temporary camp
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Wolsty North tower 13a, 500m south west of Wolsty Farm, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Wolsty South tower 13b, 200m WNW of New House, part of the Roman frontier defences along the Cumbrian coast
  • Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Written Rock of Gelt: Roman quarry inscriptions

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