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South Korea World Heritage

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Author winterkjm
Registered
#211 | Posted: 25 Dec 2016 10:12 | Edited by: winterkjm 
2019 - Seowon, Neo-Confucian Academies of the Joseon Dynasty (Referred), Southwest Coast Tidal Flats (Natural)

http://www.arirang.co.kr/News/News_View.asp?nseq=199216

Now its official, 1 nomination rule or not, Korea will be submitting 2 nominations for 2019. One of them will likely have to be delayed until the 2020 WHC.

Author elsslots
Admin
#212 | Posted: 26 Dec 2016 01:51 | Edited by: elsslots 
winterkjm:
2 nominations for 2019

It seems like they are bringing them forward to 2018 to escape this

http://world.kbs.co.kr/english/news/news_Cu_detail.htm?lang=e&id=Cu&No=124175&current _page=

P.S.: it seems like the article is mixing things up a bit (saying 2018 WH status to be achieved in 2019)
P.P.S.: it may be that we are confused and that the new rules will only come into effect at the 2020 WHC (with submissions before 1 Feb 2019), and not the Korean journalists - see my new post in the Operational Guidelines topic

Author winterkjm
Registered
#213 | Posted: 26 Dec 2016 12:40 
elsslots:
P.S.: it seems like the article is mixing things up a bit (saying 2018 WH status to be achieved in 2019)
P.P.S.: it may be that we are confused and that the new rules will only come into effect at the 2020 WHC (with submissions before 1 Feb 2019), and not the Korean journalists

Check the final line of the Arirang article.

"Korea will submit the applications in 2018 and the World Heritage Committee will make a final decision the next year."

Author winterkjm
Registered
#214 | Posted: 26 Dec 2016 12:53 | Edited by: winterkjm 
Korea may just be submitting 2 nominations for 2019 to ensure the delayed nomination will get priority in 2020? For example, the Soutthwest Coast Tidal Flats TWHS will have some priority as a natural nomination in 2019. The Seowon nomination was referred in 2016 and would be submitted in time for the 2019 WHC, but would have to be postponed until 2020 under the operational guidelines. Perhaps Korea is planning for the possibility of 35+ nominations in 2020, and in this scenario wouldn't the Seowon nomination have priority despite being from an active, heavily represented country which ratified the world heritage convention over twenty years ago?

c) the following order of priorities will be applied in case the overall annual limit of 35
nominations is exceeded:

iii) resubmitted referred nominations that were not transmitted to the relevant
Advisory Bodies for evaluation further to the application of paragraph
61.b) 1

1 This provision also applies in case the resubmitted referred nomination is received in the third
year following the referral decision.

Author clyde
Registered
#215 | Posted: 27 Dec 2016 05:53 
I'd like to have some information on Changdeokgung Palace and Huwon. I'd like to secure a place to visit the rear garden (probably at 11:30 for 90 mins) by booking online. However, I'd also like to visit the palace with an English guided tour which seems to be available at 10:30 (for 60mins).

Is it feasible to view the palace first and proceed to the booked Huwon tour right after? Is the palace exterior/courtyard free to visit on your own before the tour or access is only granted once you head for the palace interior tour?

Author nfmungard
Registered
#216 | Posted: 27 Dec 2016 09:45 
clyde:
Is it feasible to view the palace first and proceed to the booked Huwon tour right after? Is the palace exterior/courtyard free to visit on your own before the tour or access is only granted once you head for the palace interior tour?

To my recollection the meeting point for the tour is inside the courtyard of the palace. So you enter the palace, explore and meet up in time for the tour. I do think you need to pay entry plus secret garden. Imho it wasn't very complicated and we certainly did not reserve ahead of the visit.

Author clyde
Registered
#217 | Posted: 27 Dec 2016 10:37 
That's good to know. I'll buy the combination ticket as it's still worth it for Jongymo Shrine and the other palaces. However, since I'll visit during the cherry blossoms I prefer having a guaranteed entry to the secret garden just in case. Should I enjoy the experience, I might even consider revisiting the secret garden on another day.

Author winterkjm
Registered
#218 | Posted: 27 Dec 2016 11:55 | Edited by: winterkjm 
clyde:
Should I enjoy the experience, I might even consider revisiting the secret garden on another day.

Besides a revisit, which I recommend since the tour sometimes goes to slightly different portions of the palace grounds, I would also recommend Deoksugung Palace. Besides Changdeokgung, Deoksugung Palace (for me) is the most interesting of the Joseon palaces. Firstly, because the palace is a fusion of East and West architecture. Secondly, the enclave around the palace called Jeong-dong, is a great place to explore.

Author elsslots
Admin
#219 | Posted: 4 Jan 2017 05:22 
elsslots:
Solivagant: visit to the DMZ/Panmunjeom from the NORTHERN SIDE from some years ago!!I'll pay close attention to the instructions given on "the other side".

Yesterday I visited Panmunjom. The instructions given by the guide and the South Korean army guy that accompanied us weren't too cumbersome. However we had to sign a 'Visitor Declaration' - to verify that we were aware that we were to enter "a hostile area and the possibility of injury or death as a direct result of enemy action". The declaration also confirms that it is forbidden to speak to, make gestures or associate with DPRK army personnel. Nothing is said about encountering any tourists coming from the DPRK side, and how to react. However, it seems that foreign visitors on the North side are rare (our guide hadn't seen any since 2014). The southern side sees 600 - 1,000 visitors a day. The shared blue buildings in the Joint Security Area are used on a first come, first serve basis (our guide denied that there is any coordination with the North Koreans about visiting hours).

So what did we notice from North Korea? There was one soldier standing guard in front of their main building in the Joint Security Area. And we heard fine North Korean music being blasted across the border at two separate places: near the Dorasan Railway station and at the Dora observation point.

My report (in Dutch) of the day can be found here: https://elsslots.wordpress.com/2017/01/04/de-grens-met-noord-korea/

Author Solivagant
Registered
#220 | Posted: 5 Jan 2017 09:37 | Edited by: Solivagant 
elsslots:
The shared blue buildings in the Joint Security Area are used on a first come, first serve basis (our guide denied that there is any coordination with the North Koreans about visiting hours).

You might be interested in a run down I have received (from someone who "knows" but I won't give his/her name) on the details of "who" controls entry and how. I remember now when we were there that we were told that sometimes the Americans (as "UN") "forget" to unlock the door and entry cannot be made from the North! -
"So, there are several buildings which straddle the concrete line which functions as a de facto border, the central military demarcation line. The ones with blue roofs are controlled by the UN command, the South side basically. What the North Koreans call 'the Americans'. The silver ones are controlled by the North Koreans. Only one building can be entered by visitors, from North or South, it is the same building, it is a blue one, a South Korean building. So the complete control over this building comes from the South Side, the UN who are in charge of the South side of Panmunjom. The South Korean soldiers there are under UN command (and the Americans control the UN in that area). The South side simply unlocks the door when visitors from the North can go in, then they go in, go out, the they shut the door, the South side then visits and so on, they have pre-arranged times but sometimes they don't unlock it from the other side and then visitors from the North cannot go into the building. They cannot talk to each other so the reasons for this remain unknown, maybe malicious, maybe they forgot, maybe someone took the key home, who knows? "

On the matter of tourists on the DPRK side
elsslots:
it seems that foreign visitors on the North side are rare (our guide hadn't seen any since 2014).

"This is complete nonsense. Disinformation from whoever told your friend this (sad really, why would they bother?), there are visitors almost every day. At high season for Chinese tourists there can be hundreds of visitors a day. I would estimate maybe 30,000 tourists a year (mostly Chinese) go to Panmunjom from the North side. So why would they say otherwise? Isn't this number small enough already? Why lie about it? It's a pity that with the North side so full of propaganda that the free side would deliberately give out rubbish like this, very disillusioning!"

Author meltwaterfalls
Registered
#221 | Posted: 5 Jan 2017 10:08 | Edited by: meltwaterfalls 
Solivagant:
It's a pity that with the North side so full of propaganda that the free side would deliberately give out rubbish like this, very disillusioning!

I must admit my impression of the tour from the South Korean side was that there was a strong dose of propaganda involved in it, just from a different perspective to our usual idea of it.

This was actually pretty interesting to me, I've read a little too much Chomsky perhaps, but propaganda isn't just a thing that totalitarian states do.

And I'm not saying they are both as bad as each other, I know which side of the DMZ I would rather live on, but seeing how information was presented on the tour from Seoul was rather interesting. Whilst I don't remember getting the exact same line as Els regarding visits from the North, there was a strong sense that everything was just dead or a Potemkin village on the northern side, admittedly some of that is true, but some of it was managing the information to support certain views.

Author winterkjm
Registered
#222 | Posted: 5 Jan 2017 19:50 | Edited by: winterkjm 

Author winterkjm
Registered
#223 | Posted: 11 Jan 2017 03:21 | Edited by: winterkjm 
Article about why there is so much local efforts to promote potential world heritage sites.

http://www.yonhapnews.co.kr/bulletin/2017/01/11/0200000000AKR20170111102500060.HTML


The article also highlights just how many preliminary dossiers are being submitted to the Cultural Heritage Administration. (I assume, plenty are rejected) Even Seodaemun Prison is brought up, which is the first mention I've heard of this world heritage bid since 2014. One site, of which I've never heard before was mentioned:

Hoeamsa Temple Site, Yangju

Author winterkjm
Registered
#224 | Posted: 13 Feb 2017 00:43 | Edited by: winterkjm 
Korea has 4 official submissions during the next 3 years. If successful (big if), Korea will have 16 world heritage sites. City Walls, Temples, Seowon, and Tidal Flats; these nominations are fairly complex, all 4 of them are serial nominations. With the recent submitted TWHS of Unjusa Temple, Korea's tentative list numbers 15 and there are clearly other imminent nominations pending. I suspect additions to be officially submitted before April 15th.

2018

2019

Potential Imminent Nominations

Uirimji Reservoir - Jecheon (Korea)

Ganghwa Island Marine Heritage Sites (Korea)

Busan Provisional Capital (Korea)

Catholic Heritage and Martyr Sites (Korea)
Confucian Shrines of Seoul: Sungkyunkwan (Korea)
Jeju Island [Extension] (Korea)
Ruins of the Hanseong-Baekje [Extension] (Korea)

Author winterkjm
Registered
#225 | Posted: 14 Feb 2017 02:00 | Edited by: winterkjm 
Jeju Island which is the equivalent in size and population of Luxembourg, will potentially make a serious bid for additional world heritage sites. An extension and cultural landscape nomination is currently in the works.

Jeju Stone Cultural Landscape (Korea)

http://www.hani.co.kr/arti/society/area/782410.html

Jeju Volcanic Island and Lava Tubes [Extension] (Korea)

"The World Heritage headquarters will continue the study on the world heritage value of the Jeju stone cultural landscape while promoting the feasibility study for the expansion of the World Natural Heritage Site in the future."

To understand the 'Doldam' of Jeju, view this VIDEO.

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